The Public Theater Mobile Unit: The Winter’s Tale

The Winter's Tale - Public Theater - Nov 1 2017

November 1, 2017 | 6:30pm – 8:30pm

The Public Theater’s Mobile Unit, which strengthens community engagement with the arts by bringing free world-class productions of Shakespeare to communities all across New York City, journeys through tragedy into comedy with an enchanting new production of THE WINTER’S TALE, directed by Lee Sunday Evans (Caught, Porto).

Dire misunderstanding changes the course of destiny when King Leontes becomes convinced that his wife is pregnant with his friend’s child. The maligned wife perishes, the accused friend flees, and the cursed infant is left to die alone on the shore. But from the depths of tragedy, wondrous things can occur. What’s lost is found, false identities lead to true love, and the miracle of forgiveness brings new life to the world in one of Shakespeare’s most treasured romances. Registration is required and space is limited, so please RSVP to reserve your spot by emailing artsculturefun@parks.nyc.gov.

Cost: FREE

Marcus Garvey Park
18 Mount Morris Park West – enter park at 124th St and Fifth Avenue
New York NY 10027

More Info:

 

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Merry Wives of Windsor – Shakespeare Presented by The Drilling Company

Bryant Park - Upper Terrace

Friday, May 19th to Saturday, June 3rd, 2017 | 7:00pm – 9:00pm | Fridays and Saturdays

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Shakespeare’s first sit-com, featuring the classic misadventures of Falstaff and two neighborhood wives, set in an Upper West Side Co-op.

Cost: FREE

Bryant Park

41 West 40th Street – Upper Terrace

New York, NY 10018

More Info: https://www.timeout.com/newyork/blog/all-the-great-and-free-performances-coming-to-bryant-park-this-summer-041817?cid=eml~US_NYC~NL~1401104390~~Title~

Black Power Poetry Slam/Open MIC

February 3, 2017 | 6:00pm – 10:00pm 

blaack-powerAs a prelude to our upcoming Black Power 50 exhibitions, the Schomburg Center and To Whom We May Concern present a special Black Power Poetry Slam/Open Mic edition of First Fridays. Combining DJ & open mic sets, Dj IRS will provide the soundtrack to this edition of our popular monthly social gathering, where you’ll be able to groove the night away and enjoy our signature drinks.

Plus, Kevin Young, the new director of the Schomburg, will give the opening remarks, so come early!

Performers: 

  • To Whom We May Concern
  • Ras Heru
  • Backdraft
  • Se’lah
  • Bernadette Barnes
  • Brian Pineapple
  • Hapu
  • Shakespeare
  • R.A.P.  Phenomenal
  • Joy F Brown

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

515 Malcolm X Boulevard at 135th Street New York NY 10037

18+ to party | 21+ to drink. See you there! RSVP HERE

Cost: FREE. First come, first seated. For free events, we generally overbook to ensure a full house. All registered seats are released 15 to 30 minutes before start time, so we recommend that you arrive early.

Contact: Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture Phone: 917-295-6975

More Info: https://www.nypl.org/events/programs/2017/01/06/first-fridays-black-power-poetry-slamopen-mic-edition

 

 

Defiant Daughter – Harlem Renaissance Era Drama

A distinctly New York play finally lands in the city when Knock Me A Kiss, by playwright Charles Smith, begins previews Thursday in its Off-Broadway premiere at the New Federal Theatre on the Lower East Side.

Leading the cast, Tony Award nominee Andre De Shields said the role of W.E. B. Du Bois presented a great and satisfying surprise. “The role is reminiscent of Shakespeare’s tragic king, Lear, due to Du Bois’ inability to be spontaneous, his Ptolemaic need to be the center of his self-crafted universe, and his controlling relationship with his daughter, Yolande,” said De Shields. “Those similarities afforded me the opportunity to mine the tragic elements of Du Bois’ character.”

From left, sitting, Andre De Shields as W.E.B. Du Bois, and Sean Phillips as Countee Cullen. Standing, from left, Marie Thomas as Nina Du Bois, and Erin Cherry as Yolande Du Bois.

The year is 1928, and the daughter of America’s foremost black intellectual, Du Bois, is just one month away from marrying a young poet, Countee Cullen, whose work was considered one of the pinnacles of the New Negro movement, which we now know as the Harlem Renaissance.

The marriage marked the height of the renaissance and was viewed as the perfect union of African-American talent and beauty. It would unfold during the apex of a cultural phenomenon, which through intellect, literature, art, and music challenged the era’s pervasive racism and stereotypes, and redefined how America and the world perceived African-Americans.

What could go wrong?

“I want the audience, after seeing this play, to investigate these characters and dig deeper into the life of W.E.B. Du Bois, Countee Cullen, and the Harlem Renaissance,” said Chuck Smith, the Chicago-based, Emmy winning director of the play and one of its producers. “I want viewers to see what’s changed, and get more involved in our culture. They should know that the lifestyle of affluent black Americans is not that much different than anyone else,” Smith said.

Erin Cherry as Yolande Du Bois and Morocco Omari as Jimmy Lunceford.

The play opens as jazz bandleader, Jimmy Lunceford, woos a willing but skittish Yolande Du Bois, who insists that she and Lunceford be married in a manner befitting her stature. She tells her friend, Lenora, “I want to touch and kiss and all he wants to do is hump and bump.”

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/len-hollie/defiant-daughter-emerges-_b_780960.html