Franz Hackl – Harlem Jazz Series

Franz Hackl – Harlem Jazz Series – Harlem Jazz Series – November 22, 2016 | 12:00pm – 2:00pm
jahr-der-berge-ny-ttFranz Hackl, trumpeter, composer and brass instrument maker is founder and artistic director of the Outreach Orchestra, Festival and Academy and leads his own group, Franz Hackl’s IDO Quartet His feed-forward approach, building on traditions and looking beyond the fashionable trend, leads to his distinctive style. As a trumpet player Franz has toured the international festival circuit and concert halls for over twenty years and performed in renown Jazz clubs like the Jazz Standard (as a leader), Blue Note, Birdland, and Sweet Basil to name a few. As a composer Franz was commissioned to write original music for the “Year of the Mountains” launch event at the United Nations for the opening of the Austrian Cultural Forum in New York, and has composed for numerous festivals and ensembles such as Tiroler Festspiele, Europ. Forum Alpbach, Klangspuren, Festival der Regionen and the Absolute Ensemble.
Featuring: Franz Hakcl – trumpet, fluglhorn, Ron Oswanski – piano, accordion, Mark Egan – bass, and Mino Cinelu – percussion
Rendall Memorial Presbyterian Church
59 West 137th Street
New York NY 10037
1st set: Noon – 12:45pm (15 min break) 2nd Set: 1:00pm – 1:45pm
House doors open at 11:30am
Price: $15
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Five Blue Slip – Apartments

5-blue-slipFIVE BLUE SLIP 102 apartments at 5 BLUE SLIP, GREENPOINT, BROOKLYN Amenities: Laundry room, bicycle room, fitness room & landscaped community courtyard.  Transit: G/7, B32  No application fee • No broker’s fee • Smoke-free building • More information: http://www.fiveblueslip.com

Score an $368 apartment

9306 Shore Front – 63 Apartments

 63 apartments at 9306 Shore Front Parkway, Rockaway Beach, Queens. Amenities: Video Intercom, *Laundry Room, Indoor Recreation Space, *Storage, and *Parking (*additional fees apply). Transit: A/S train, Q53, Q52, Q22, QM17 Buses  No application fee • No broker’s fee • More information: http://www.lemlewolff.com

Score a $494 apartment

High Hawk – 72 apartments in the Bronx

boston-post-road72 apartments at 1776 Boston Road, Crotona Park East, Bronx Amenities:  on-site resident manager, security cameras, bicycle storage, parking*, on-site laundry*, community room, outside recreation area (*additional fees apply).  Transit: 2/5   Bus: BX11, BX19, BX21, BX 36 No application fee • No broker’s fee • Smoke-free building 

Apartments start at $788

Harlem Christmas Day Gospel Concert

Christmas Postcards_3-01If you have never been to an authentic gospel concert, look no further. Welcome to Harlem is the tour company that will provide you with an unforgettable experience on Christmas Day!

This 2 hour Christmas Day Gospel Concert will bring joy to your heart and soul.  Gospel music is a powerfully uplifting experience that everyone should experience.  We intend to have you toe-clapping, foot-stomping, and singing along with the soulful rhythms of African American gospel music that will fill the church on Christmas Day.

House doors open at 10:30 am

Price $20

Mt. Morris Ascension Presbyterian Church

15 Mount Morris Park West
New York, NY 10027

Graham Haynes and Synesthesia – Harlem Afternoon Jazz Series

GRAHAM HAYNESGraham Haynes is regarded as an innovator on cornet and flugelhorn, an extraordinary composer, and an emerging force in contemporary electronic music and world music. His two years at Queens College studying composition, harmony and theory spurred his interest in classical and electronic music. He formed the band Five Elements with alto saxophonist Steve Coleman, which launched the M-Base collective, an influential group of NY improvisers. During the late ‘80’s Haynes immersed himself in a wide range of African, Arabic and South Asian music; since 2000 he has worked as a composer and music director on several multimedia projects. Graham has recorded fifteen critically acclaimed CD’s as a leader and countless CD’s as a side person. Since 2013 Haynes has been a member of the Vijay Iyer Sextet. Graham tours annually in Europe, Asia, and Africa and appeared several times on national television.

Featuring:

Graham Haynes  – Cornet and Dousngoni
Alex Marcelo – Piano
Adam Rudolph – Percussion

1st set: Noon – 12:45pm (15-min break) 2nd set: 1:00 – 1:45pm

House doors open at 11:30am

November 3, 2015

Price: $15

Rendall Memorial Presbyterian Church

59 West 137th Street
New York, NY 10037

NYC charter schools worry about de Blasio’s plans

NEW YORK >> Operators of New York City’s publicly financed, privately run charter schools are bracing for changes promised by Mayor-elect Bill de Blasio — including the possibility of having to pay rent — that they worry could reverse 12 years of growth enjoyed under Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

Students last week enter the Success Academy and Opportunity Charity schools, which share space inside P.S. 241 in the Harlem section of Manhattan. Associated Press

Students last week enter the Success Academy and Opportunity Charity schools, which share space inside P.S. 241 in the Harlem section of Manhattan. Associated Press

De Blasio has pledged to charge rent to “well-resourced” charter schools and has called for a moratorium on allowing new charters to share buildings with traditional schools, taking aim at a Bloomberg policy that helped the schools grow from 17 to 183 during his time in office. The policy has also led to complaints that the charters draw an unfair amount of resources.

“It is insult to injury to give them free rent,” de Blasio said last summer, while campaigning for the Democratic nomination.

Charter school backers around the country are watching to see what happens in New York — which they consider an incubator for the charter school movement — while de Blasio supporters hope that the changes help fulfill his campaign promise to improve educational access for all children. De Blasio takes office on Jan. 1.

“The nation as a whole has always looked to New York City in this area,” said Nina Rees, president of the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools. “The climate in New York City is a healthy one because of the co-location arrangements.”

A majority of the nation’s charter schools either pay rent or are paying off a loan or bond issue for their buildings, according to Rees’ group, but New York City real estate pressures make that a challenge. She said that many charter schools wouldn’t have been able to open if they had to find their own building and start from scratch.

It’s unclear how much New York’s charters would pay. De Blasio has said he would use a sliding scale, with deep-pocketed charter operators forced to pay more, while some schools would continue to pay nothing.  A spokeswoman said that de Blasio would work out the plan with his schools chancellor.

The city’s Independent Budget Office estimates that facility costs for the 40,000 charter school students in co-located buildings average $2,320 per pupil and that the city could raise $92 million if it charged rent. There are 114 charter schools co-located within traditional schools.

Critics note that more than a dozen New York City charter school executives are paid more than current New York City Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott’s $212,614. Harlem Village Academies chief Deborah Kenny earns $499,146. Eva Moskowitz, a former City Council member and founder of Success Academies, earns $475,244.

Moskowitz has grown Success from one Harlem school in 2006 to 20 schools in several neighborhoods, with six more slated to open next fall. Its 6,700 pupils make it the city’s largest charter operator.

“We can’t afford it, and it would be taking dollars away from children and from their education to pay rent on a public school,” said Kerri Lyon, a spokeswoman for Success.

Moskowitz — who helped stage a march of more than 10,0000 people across the Brooklyn Bridge to protest de Blasio’s plans in October — has been singled out by de Blasio for criticism.

“There’s no way in hell Eva Moskowitz should get free rent, OK? “ de Blasio said at a forum in June. He told a United Federation of Teachers meeting last May that Moskowitz’s schools have “a destructive impact on the schools they’re going into.”

Schools that share space typically use separate entrances and have separate floors. Charter school detractors have complained that charter students get the best of everything, from playground equipment to bathrooms.

Ellen Darensbourg, a teacher at Public School 241, which shares a Harlem building with Harlem Success Academy 4 and another charter school, said that her school has been forced to move around the building numerous times over the last six years to give the charters more space.

Darensbourg said P.S. 241’s physical and occupational therapists have to work with special-needs kids in the hallway and the art teacher moves from room to room with a cart because the school no longer has a classroom — though the Success Academy school has an art classroom.

“It’s OK for their kids to have an art studio but it wasn’t necessary for our kids,” she said.

Lyon said that Success Academy generally enjoys a “pretty positive relationships with the schools that we share space with.”

Charter schools are run by private entities and have more freedom than traditional public schools to set their own hours and curriculum and pupils are chosen by lottery. Supporters say they give families an alternative to substandard public schools, while opponents point to studies that show mixed results.

New York City’s 70,000 charter school pupils represent about 6 percent of the city’s 1.1 million public school students.

Bill Phillips, president of the Northeast Charter Schools Network, said that charging rent and halting co-locations would slow the growth of charters to a trickle and deprive families of an option they want.

“These are public school kids,” Phillips said. “It is perfectly appropriate for them to be in public school space.”

By Karen Matthews, Associated Press

No record of tennis great Gibson in 1940 census

NEW YORK (AP) — It was on the streets of her Harlem neighborhood in the 1940s that teenager Althea Gibson began working on the tennis skills that would take her all the way to winning Wimbledon.

But according to the 1940 census, the trailblazing athlete didn’t even exist.

There’s no record of Gibson and her family in the decennial census, the records of which were released online to the public April 2 by the U.S. National Archives after a 72-year confidentiality period lapsed.

She and her family aren’t the only ones – more than a million black people weren’t accounted for in 1940, an undercount that had ramifications at the time on everything from the political map to the distribution of resources.

It also had an impact on the Census Bureau itself, the agency said, leading to efforts that continue to this day as it counts people every decade, to assess how well it managed to count people and to determine what could be done to improve. An analysis of the 2010 Census’ efficacy is being released May 22.

The undercount estimate has generally gone down, but it’s always been disproportionately higher for blacks than nonblacks.

There are a variety of reasons for undercounts – people move around; people may not know or be reluctant to answer government questions; address lists may be inaccurate; extremely crowded areas can be difficult to count, as can extremely isolated areas. Experts believe some of those factors weigh more heavily on minority undercounts, particularly the challenges of counting in urban areas.

The 1940 census was long known to have a black undercount. Evidence of it was found within a decade in a demographic study of young children and another of draft-age men. But modern-day genealogists digging into the newly released 1940 census records may be rediscovering it when they cannot locate their relatives or friends.

The absence of Gibson and her family in the available records points toward an omission.

Celedonia “Cal” Jones knows that Gibson lived in Harlem at the time, because the Manhattan borough historian emeritus grew up on the same block as her and remembers playing with her as a child.

“I know she lived on the block, because she used to dominate the paddle tennis,” Jones said. “Her nickname was `tomboy.”‘

It can be difficult to find entries in the 1940 census, since there’s no complete name index for the records currently available and won’t be for a few months longer. But Lillian Chisholm, Gibson’s sole surviving sister who was born in August 1940, confirmed the family lived at 135 W. 143rd St. at that time, making it possible to look up the census ledger.

An enumerator visited the building on at least five occasions in April 1940, according to the census records. An Associated Press review of the records found no listing of Gibson, who was 12 at the time, or her parents, at that address, though other building residents were counted.

There had been anecdotal information of population undercounts in previous censuses, but it was the data from the 1940 effort that really made it clear, said Phil Sparks, former associate director of the bureau and now co-director of The Census Project, which advocates for an accurate count.

Government officials were able to see that the count was off, particularly in the count of black men of a certain age group in the South, because they were using census data to plan for how many would be registering to fight in World War II, Sparks said. More signed up than were expected.

“From the standpoint of the war effort, it was a good thing to have happened,” he said, “but suppose it had been the other way around?”

According to census reports, the black undercount was estimated at 8.4 percent in 1940, meaning that a population counted at 12.9 million was actually more like 14.1 million. The undercount for the nonblack population was 5 percent, or about 6.3 million people. The total undercount for all races was 7.5 million.

The U.S. Census Bureau tried to reach out to the black community as it prepared to undertake the 1940 census. Documents obtained by The Associated Press at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum in Hyde Park, N.Y., show that the agency was particularly concerned about counting blacks in America at that time.

“The Census of 1940 will answer two questions of primary importance,” bureau officials wrote in a statement titled “The Negro and the 1940 Census” made available to teachers, speakers and writers at the time. Those questions included “how many Negroes are there now in the United States?” and “has their proportion decreased … or has it taken an unexpected – and unprecedented – upswing?”

These facts “may have a tremendously important bearing upon the determination of the Negro’s place in American life,” the officials wrote.

The statement was part of a nationwide publicity campaign to “impress upon the Negro citizen of the United States the importance of full and honest cooperation.” Letters were sent out to black trade associations, YMCAs and social and civic organizations. Edward Lawson, a managing editor of Opportunity: The Journal of Negro Life, was hired to supervise the campaign.

However, there is evidence that the campaign to count the country’s blacks was uneven.

In one case, the New Orleans chapter of the Urban League Inc., sent a letter to President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s wife alleging “willful omission of negroes from staff of census enumerators in New Orleans,” according to a copy of the document obtained by the AP from the FDR library.

The U.S. Census Bureau said it would have to check into the situation when asked about Gibson and her family not being part of the 1940 count, but didn’t respond with an answer.

Jones isn’t surprised that his childhood friend and others somehow got left out.

“It’s part and parcel of being written out of history, that’s the first step,” he said. “You don’t count.”

The importance of an accurate count is vital, since the data is used in a number of ways. That includes the main purpose, written into the U.S. Constitution, that Congressional districts are apportioned by the census population counts. But it also matters because federal dollars flow to states and localities based on that effort, meaning a wrong count in a census year can impact a whole decade.

“It literally can mean the difference of tens of millions, hundreds of millions, of dollars,” Sparks said.

Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved.

Read more: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/tennis/news/20120520/1940-census-althea-gibson/#ixzz1vYgUkfAU

Harlem becomes magnet for wealthier New Yorkers

Luxury penthouse in One Museum Mile goes for $3.1 million – a sign of things to come

Penthouse at 1280 Fifth Ave. that sold for $3.1 million.  There goes the old neighborhood.

Apartment prices are on the rise again in Harlem as the historic area increasingly becomes a magnet for wealthier New Yorkers and topnotch attractions like the Museum for African Art.

A luxury penthouse in One Museum Mile — the same building at 1280 Fifth Ave. that houses the museum — just sold for $3.1 million. And developers say it’s a sign of things to come.

Museum President Elsie McCabe said this will be good for Harlem. “No housing was lost, no one was displaced here,” she said. “This only adds housing to the neighborhood and brings a higher-income demographic that increases the local diversity.”

More importantly, McCabe said, “it adds a cultural context this part of the city has never seen before.

“Museums are economic engines,” she said. “We expect more than 630,000 visitors in our first year of operation. This will bring money in from outside the community, the city, and country.”

But not everybody is thrilled by the transformation taking place in what many consider the nation’s preeminent African-American neighborhood.

Councilwoman Melissa Mark-Viverito warned it could embolden local landlords to drive up rents. “Those prices are sheer madness,” she said.

The One Museum Mile building, in particular, is a “sore spot,” she added.

“That building was originally slotted for education purposes, then the museum became community space for the luxury condos.”

What Harlem needs, Mark-Viverito said, is more affordable housing.

Good luck with that.

The newly purchased penthouse, which sold for around $1,767 per square-foot, didn’t shatter selling price records. But it’s leading a trend.

The Central Park Conservancy found that home values around 110th St. jumped 39% from 2007 to 2012.

“The restoration and ongoing maintenance done by the Conservancy has had something to do with the real estate renaissance taking place on the north end of the park,” says Doug Blonsky, president of the Central Park Conservancy. “With the Conservatory Garden and Harlem Meer, it’s become one of the best sections to live on the entire park.”

The price per square foot record puts the area on the same playing field as Chelsea, the East Village, and parts of the upper West Side.

One Museum Mile, located at the northeast tip of Central Park, has more in common with the multimillion-dollar prewar co-ops 20 blocks south than its neighbors. The price per square foot for the sprawling three-bedroom, three-bath doubles and triples current sale prices in and around El Barrio and Central Park North.

Designed by 15 Central Park West architect Robert A.M. Stern in conjunction with Andre Kikoski and SLCE Architects, the building boasts stunning views of Central Park and one of the highest rooftop pools in the city. Its swank common areas include a gym, children’s playroom, teens lounge, catering kitchen and formal dining room on Central Park, plus a 24-hour doorman and on-site parking garage.

Opera singer Kathleen Battle and several NFL stars are among the well-heeled homebuyers who have been spotted touring the building. “That pool and roof are incredible,” says Walt Frazier 3rd, son of the Knicks basketball great, who is a Keller Williams real estate agent. “There isn’t another building like it in Harlem.”

CORE CEO Shaun Osher said nine contracts have gone out to buyers in recent weeks.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/real-estate/harlem-magnet-wealthier-yorkers-article-1.1075686#ixzz1ulzq0pee

Apollo Theater Competes Against Other City Landmarks for Preservation Cash

HARLEM — Mention the Apollo Theater and the first things that come to mind are the legendary entertainers who got their start there, Amateur Night and its notoriously tough audience and the storied position the theater holds in Harlem’s history.

The Apollo is vying to win a $200,000 grant to help preserve and restore the ornate architecture inside its main theater. (Apollo Theater) Often overlooked is the beauty of the ornate plaster architectural detailing inside the theater, which was built in 1914 as a neo-classical burlesque hall.

“The ornate work is extremely important because basically it is the frame of the main theater,” said Apollo spokesperson Nina Flowers.

“It surrounds the stage and the box seats and is as much a part of the uniqueness of the Apollo as the Tree of Hope or the stage itself,”

Now, the Apollo is asking fans to vote for it to receive a $200,000 grant to preserve the interior of the state and national landmark from American Express and the National Trust for Historic Preservation as part of the 2012 Partners in Preservation grant program.

“The plaster work was created by skilled artisans when the theater was first built in 1914 and it is one of those not so obvious things that is a major part of the historic beauty and character of this place,” said Flowers.

Under the month-long campaign which launched April 26, the Apollo Theater will compete with 40 other New York City area locations for $3 million in funding.

The top four will receive grants, while the remaining funds will be divided up based on the recommendations of an advisory panel of civic and historic preservation leaders.

The Apollo Theater will be competing against other well-known city landmarks such as the Guggenheim Museum, which wants to preserve its entrance doors, the High Line, which wants to restore a sunken deck overlooking Tenth Avenue, and the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum which wants to restore sails and missiles.

The program has already distributed $6 million to six other cities including New Orleans, San Francisco and Chicago. It’s an important part of helping to “safeguard national treasures like the Apollo Theater,” said Apollo President and CEO Jonelle Procope.

“This type of skilled work and detail cannot be found in modern theaters, so it is something that absolutely needs to be preserved,” said Flowers.

Fans will be able to vote once per day through May 21.

In conjunction with the contest, the Apollo is hosting an open house on May 5 and 6 where visitors can take free, self-guided tours of the theater.

The Apollo will also launch “Apollo Memories” during that open house weekend, a digital oral history initiative where people will give their memories of the Apollo.

Those video recordings will be combined on a website with the remembrances of Apollo Legends such as Quincy Jones, Aretha Franklin, Smoky Robinson and others.

“We encourage our fans in the neighborhood and around the world to support the Apollo by casting their votes for the Theater, and also look forward to hearing about their most memorable Apollo experiences,” said Procope.

Read more: http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20120427/harlem/apollo-theater-competes-against-other-city-landmarks-for-preservation-cash#ixzz1tL4t3coQ