Brasil SummerFest 2018

July 29th to August 12th, 2018 – Various show times and locations

Head to the Brasil Summerfest, an annual festival featuring Brazilian music, food and films exported straight from Brazil to NYC. Various venues across New York City. This year’s dates: July 29th to August 12th.

August 10th – 7 pm and 10 pm
Rodrigo Amarante and Ava Roca will team up to perform two shows at National Sawdust, 80 North Sixth Street, Brooklyn NY 11249.

Please check website for schedule and locations as there are various performances and venues.

Cost: $20 for August 10th concert. Various prices for events. Please check website for performance schedule, locations and prices. 

Locations include National Sawdust, 80 North Sixth Street, Brooklyn NY 11249. Please check website for performance schedule, locations and prices.

More Info: http://brasilsummerfest.com/

 

Advertisements

25th African Film Festival NY- The Fruitless Tree – U.S Premiere

June 7, 2018 | 7:00pm – 10:00pm

The Fruitless Tree – U.S. Premiere

Director: Aïcha Elhadj Macky; Country: Niger/France; Year: 2016; Running Time: 52min; and Language: French and Haoussa with English subtitles.

As a married but childless woman, Aicha finds herself in a situation that is totally “out of the ordinary” in her country, Niger, where women are expected to have children. But just like everywhere else in the world today, Niger also experiences problems with infertility. Based on her personal story, Aicha Macky explores the private suffering of women in her situation with great sensitivity. Speaking openly as a childless woman among mothers, she breaks a taboo in Nigerien society.

Cost: $10. Refunds only up until 1 day before the event.

Maysles Cinema
343 Lenox Avenue
New York NY 10027

More Info: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-fruitless-tree-us-premiere-tickets-45865921205

Stories of Love and Passion – NYADIFF Film Festival

ADIFF 2018

April 27 to April 29, 2018 | 2:00pm – 11:00pm

The African Diaspora International Film Festival and the Office of the VP for Diversity & Community Affairs at Teachers College, Columbia University invites you to our film series, STORIES OF LOVE AND PASSION.

 

 

 

SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE:
Friday, April 27
7pm – No Time to Die – Free screening

Saturday, April 28
1:00pm – Ava & Gabriel
3:00pm – Sins of the Flesh
5:30pm – The Citizen
8:00pm – Never Came Back – Q&A & reception

Sunday, April 29
2:00pm – Rosa Chumbe
4:00pm – Foreign Body
6:00pm – The Naked Poet

Directions: Train 1 to 116th Street. FREE Street Parking on Saturday and Sunday.

For more information about the African Diaspora International Film Festival, to receive links and high resolution images please contact, Diarah N’Daw-Spech at (212) 864-1760/ fax (212) 316-6020 or e-mail pr@nyadiff.org

The African Diaspora International Film Festival is a 501(c)(3) not for profit organization.
Cost: FREE SCREENING on Fri., 4/27 at 7pm; Sat., 4/28 & Sun., 4/29 screenings – General price: $13; Students/Seniors: $11. Passes: Weekend Pass: $40. Special Event: Never Came Back – screening, discussion/Q&A and reception: $15.

Columbia University – Teachers College
525 West 120th Street – 263 Macy
New York NY 10027

More Info: http://nyadiff.org/

2017 NY ADIFF – Gala Screenings: “Caribbean Girl NYC” & “Between 2 Shores”

ADIFF - photo

December 9, 2017 | 6:00pm – 11:00pm

Film screenings: CARIBBEAN GIRL NYC and  BETWEEN 2 SHORES.
6:00 pm – Red Carpet; 7:00 pm – Screening; and Q&A and Reception.

Pilot of an upcoming TV Series, Caribbean Girl NYC tells an immigrant story, in a millennial way, set in the heart of New York City–the ultimate destination. Directed by Mariette Monpierre, USA/ Guadeloupe, 2017, Comedy, 27 min, English.

Q&A after the screenings and a catered reception! The actors and the crew of Caribbean Girl NYC will be present at the screening and they will participate in the Q&A!

Between 2 Shores – Santo Domingo to Pointe-A-Pitre
Leaving their children behind and searching for a better life, two women arrive illegally in Guadeloupe, on French territory. 13 years later, they made a life for themselves and are legal but are still fighting to get the proper papers for their children to come and live with them. A sensitive look at the struggle of these women and the devastating impact on the children growing in Santo Domingo while their mothers live in Guadeloupe. Directed by Mariette Monpierre, France/ Guadeloupe/ Dominican Republic, 2017, Documentary, 53 min, French / Spanish with English subtitles.

Cost: $25

MIST Harlem
46 W 116th St btwn Malcolm X Blvd and Fifth Avenue
New York NY 10026

 

 

 

 

2017 NYADIFF – Afro-Latino Program

ADIFF - photo

November 28, 2017 | 7:00pm – 9:00pm

The AFRO-LATINO PROGRAM
Starting Sunday, November 26, 2017 at 7 pm – Q&A running through Tuesday, November 28, 2017 at 7 pm– Q&A and Refreshments.

THE INVISIBLE COLOR –  World Premiere.

Sergio Giral |US | 2017 | 60 min | Documentary |English and (Spanish with English subtitles).  This latest documentary by the Dean of Afro-Cuban Cinema, Sergio Giral investigates the black Cuban exile in South Florida, since the first wave of political refugees in the 1959 revolutionary aftermath, to today. It tracks its presence throughout the region, and highlights its contribution to Miami’s civic culture through testimonies and visual documentation.

Valley of The Black Descendants (El Valle de Los Negros) – Q&A; NY Premiere. Sun., Nov. 26th @ 7PM and  Tues., Nov. 28 @ 7PM.

In the Azapa Valley (Chile), an oasis in the driest desert in the world, a group of descendants of enslaved men and women brought from Africa are organizing the first African census in the history of Chile. Their aim is to get official recognition from the State that has concealed their culture and African identity for more than 200 years. Directed by Richard Salgado, Chile, 2017, 52 min. Documentary, Spanish with English subtitles.

Cost: $20

Teachers College, Columbia University
525 W 120th Street
New York NY 10027

 

Films @ the Schomburg: 25th Anniversary Screening of JUICE

Jul 7, 2017 6:30pm – 8:30pm

Released in 1992, the hip hop-fueled drama Juice stars Omar Epps and presents the acting debut of Tupac Shakur, alongside Jermaine “Huggy” Hopkins, Khalil Kain, and Samuel L. Jackson. Join us for a screening of this 90s classic and talkback with the film’s director Ernest Dickerson, actor Kahlil Kain (“Raheem”), and surprise guests on the 25th anniversary of the film. Following the film will be a 90s music-themed after party.

Please be advised that this film is rated R (age 17+) for strong language and some violence.

Cost: FREE! For free events, we generally overbook to ensure a full house. All registered seats are released 15 to 30 minutes before start time, so we recommend that you arrive early.

Contact: Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

Location: 515 Malcolm X Boulevard at 135th Street, New York NY 10037 US

http://www.calendarwiz.com/calendars/popup.php?op=view&id=113061277&crd=welcometoharlem

A Famous Chef, a Family Affair

Chef Marcus Samuelsson

On Tuesday night, chef Marcus Samuelsson cooked dinner for 35 in his Harlem apartment to benefit the Maysles Institute, a nearby not-for-profit documentary film house and community education center.

“They have a fantastic institution that is both international and local,” said Mr. Samuelsson. “When I opened Red Rooster, I went to them for guidance on how to be an incredible neighbor.”

The event was a family affair for Mr. Maysles, the prolific documentary filmmaker known for such films as “Grey Gardens” and “Gimme Shelter.” His wife, Gillian Walker, selected Indian saris to dress the dinner tables. Their son Philip was DJ and checked coats; their daughters Sara and Rebekah served dinner, along with the institute’s directors and its accountant.

An oyster dish

An oyster dish

“We’re using our money wisely,” said chair of the board Amanda Benchley, who became enchanted with the Maysles after visiting with them in their Harlem brownstone. “About an hour in I started making cucumber sandwiches with Gillian because it was 4 o’clock and that’s what they do everyday at 4 o’clock,” she said. “I stayed for four hours. I roll very easily into that kind of environment.”

The evening’s menu was made up of “all things Albert loves,” said Mr. Samuelsson: oysters on the half shell, fried chicken, Ethiopian ramen, warm farro salad and coffee-roasted duck, as well as dark chocolate and strawberry ice cream made by Ms. Walker.

Albert Maysles chats with Iris Apfel.

Albert Maysles chats with Iris Apfel.

Mr. Maysles, who will turn 86 in a couple of weeks, was seated next to 91 year-old fashion icon Iris Apfel, the subject of one of his work-in-progress documentaries. Otherwise the evening was populated by the friends of Ms. Benchley and her co-hosts, Kate and Andy Spade.

“Al played Santa in our ad campaign,” said Ms. Spade.

How did he fare on the other side of the camera?

“He was fantastic,” said Mr. Spade. “Rather than hire models, we brought in his friends. We paid the institute and got better models than we could have from an agency.”

The dinner table

The dinner table

This week the institute is showcasing a typically eclectic roster of films: “T.V. Transvestite,” a rarely seen 1982 drag culture documentary; “Unseen Tears,” about a Native American boarding school in Western New York; and “The Central Park Five,” Ken and Sarah Burns’s film revisiting the wrongful rape conviction and imprisonment of five Harlem teenagers in 1989.

“We all know that we should love our neighbors,” said Mr. Maysles. “But how are we going to love our neighbors if we don’t even know them?”

A version of this article appeared November 15, 2012, on page A25 in the U.S. edition of The Wall Street Journal, with the headline: A Famous Chef, A Family Affair.

Advancing Uptown Arts Renaissance, Pop-Up Gallery Spotlights African Beauty and Brutality

A bold new show at Art in FLUX Harlem illuminates the brutal practice of female circumcision and the horrors of homophobia in traditional African cultures, while also celebrating the continent’s gifts. Called “Echoes,” the exhibits join the effort by local artists and curators to breathe life into the uptown arts scene.

“We’re trying to highlight the differences, or the cultural richness, of the African continent,” said Ibou Ndoye, one of the exhibit’s two curators, referring to the 17 artists’ varying backgrounds. The exhibit continues through the month.

Continue reading