Taming Traders: Origins of the New York Stock Exchange

Taming Traders - Origins of New York Stock Exchange - exhibition ends June 11 2017

March 31 – June 11, 2017

On May 17, 1792―under a buttonwood tree, the site of street trading at the time―24 stock brokers signed an agreement that regulated aspects of trading, thus creating the New York Stock Exchange. Before then, in the early days of the new republic when the United States was deeply in debt, it was Alexander Hamilton’s job as the first Secretary of the Treasury to persuade his colleagues in the first Congress that debt could be a beneficial commodity that could be sold and traded. But rampant speculation in war debt and bank stock turned to financial panic and provided the cautionary backdrop for the drafting of the Buttonwood Agreement in May 1792, which would change global commerce forever.

On the 225th anniversary of the New York Stock Exchange, Taming Traders: Origins of the New York Stock Exchange charts the development of this crucial trading institution. Objects on display include early bond and stock certificates, correspondence, portraits of traders, and views of Wall Street and the Tontine Coffee House. Also on view will be video clips from New-York Historical’s major oral history project, “Remembering Wall Street, 1950-1980.” The exhibition is curated by Dr. Michael Ryan, New-York Historical vice president and director of the Patricia D. Klingenstein Library. Exhibition closes June 11, 2017.

Cost: Adults: $20; Seniors/Educators/Active Military: $15; Students: $12; Children (5-13 yrs old): $6 and Children 4 yrs and under: FREE. Museum galleries and Museum store Hours: Tuesday-Thursday, Saturday – 10am-6pm; Friday – 10am-8pm; Sunday – 11am-5pm; and Monday – CLOSED.

New York Historical Society

170 Central Park West at 77th Street

New York, NY 10024

Phone: (212) 873-3400

Website/more Info: http://www.nyhistory.org/exhibitions/taming-traders-origins-new-york-stock-exchange

Hamilton and Washington – February 28, 2017 | 6:30pm – 8:00pm

Hamilton and Washington – February 28, 2017 | 6:30pm – 8:00pm

Alexander Hamilton and George Washington, America’s most storied Founding Fathers, shared a complex and, at times, contentious personal relationship. Three early American historians reveal the complicated story of these iconic statesmen who, though never true friends, worked together tirelessly to establish the Nation.
Carol Berkin is presidential professor of history emerita at Baruch College and the Graduate Center, CUNY. John Steele Gordon is the author of numerous books on American history, including Hamilton’s Blessing: The Extraordinary Life and Times of Our National Debt. Richard Brookhiser (moderator) is a senior editor at National Review and the author of Alexander Hamilton, American.

Location: The Robert H. Smith Auditorium at the New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West, New York, NY 10024

Cost: $38 for Non-members; $24 for members.
To purchase tickets by phone: Please contact New-York Historical’s in-house call center at (212) 485-9268. Call center is open 9 am–5 pm daily.

In person: Advance tickets may be purchased on site at New-York Historical’s Admissions desk during museum hours.

http://ow.ly/aEh7304FtUp

Hamilton Grange – Harlem Travel Guide – Sutro World

Home of a Founding Father or National Treasure

West Harlem is the only community in the northeast that is home to two national memorials — Ulysses S. Grant National Memorial Park (see Riverside Park) and Alexander Hamilton’s Hamilton Grange. The Grange, which was named for Hamilton’s ancestral estate in Scotland, was his country home, designed by John McComb Jr., and originally sat on Hamilton’s 32-acre estate-the house was erected on what is now 143rd Street. Hamilton was one of our Founding Fathers and the first Secretary of the Treasury. The two-story Federal-style frame house was completed in 1802, just two years before his death in a duel with Aaron Burr, another Founding Father, and the nation’s third Vice President. The Grange was moved four blocks west to Convent Avenue in 1889. The original porches and other features were removed for the move. The staircase was removed and retrofitted to accommodate a makeshift entrance on the side of the house and the original grand Federal-style entrance was boarded up. To make room for the development of a row house community, the developer gave the Grange to St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, which in 1885 erected its landmark church at 141st Street and Convent Avenue after moving uptown from Greenwich Village. The Grange was wedged between the church and an apartment building which obscured its original beauty. It was purchased by the American Scenic and Historic Preservation Society in 1924, opened to the public nine years later, and donated to the U.S. Department of the Interior in 1962. In 1960 the property was designated a National Historic Landmark and in 1967 it was designated a New York City landmark. It was moved inside St. Nicholas Park (still inside the boundaries of Hamilton’s original estate) in 2008, which allows it to be returned to its former glory with the original porches, main entrance doorway, and main staircase. When it reopens some time in 2011, the public will again be allowed to enjoy guided tours inside the national landmark.

Checkout the statue of Alexander Hamilton in front of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church before going into The City College (CCNY) of the City University of New York. Here you will find the most beautiful Collegiate Gothic-designed buildings in New York City.

Transportation: Bus—M3, M100, M101. Subway—A, B, C, D to 145th St.

Features

  • More than 360 entries with over 2000 photographs
  • This visually rich app consists of detailed New York City visitor’s information from visitor centers, tourist websites, weather, news, holidays, sales tax, smoking rules, tipping and transportation to and from airports and in the city
  • Detailed descriptions which include uncommonly known cultural and historical facts, websites, phone numbers, hours of operation, prices, menus and hyperlinks that link entries and lead to websites for additional historical and factual information.
  • Entries sorted by name, category, distance, price, and neighborhood
  • Once click to websites, phones, online ordering, online reservations, current menus and more
  • Live calendar
  • Ability to share user comments and mark and save favorites
  • Ask the authors questions through in-app comments to get personalized feedback at your finger tips
  • YouTube videos
  • GPS enabled Google maps with walking, driving and mass transit directions
  • Access offline content anytime
  • Free upgrades for life

What’s inside

  • Nightlife and entertainment from jazz, Latin salsa, opera to classical music;
  • Theatre, dance, spoken word and more;
  • Restaurants featuring soul food to French cuisine and everything in between;
  • Unique ethnic retail shops;
  • Museums that celebrate various cultures;
  • Fine art galleries;
  • Majestic churches and gospel music;
  • Amazing landmarks;
  • Parks and free recreational activities;
  • Guest accommodations;
  • Free internet access and Wi-fi locations;
  • Authentic tours of Harlem;
  • Annual events and festivals;
  • Sales & Deals

   Literally a guide in my pocket

Posted by Max on 13th Jan 2012

I can only subscribe to what other people already have told about the guide. It’s just great that I can read a place description, actually give a call its manager, find it on a map and even hook up on its Twitter channel to keep my eye on it. Very smart!

Download the free Sutro World @ www.sutromedia.com/world and purchase the Harlem Travel Guide today for $2.99!

Follow Welcome to Harlem on:

Website www.welcometoharlem.com Yelphttp://www.yelp.com/biz/welcome-to-harlem-new-york Trip Advisorhttp://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d1977036-Reviews-Welcome_to_Harlem-New_York_City_New_York.html

Famous Fish Market – Harlem Travel Guide – iPhone, iPad, iPod

Where the locals go for fried fish or local fav

We don’t know what came first, the name Famous Fish Market or—because the fried fish is so doggone good—the reputation. This place does one thing, and does it right …. fried fish, shrimp and chips. The take-out-only basement restaurant is literally a hole in the wall and can easily be missed if it weren’t for the long line, especially for dinner, which snakes down St. Nicholas Avenue. Portions are more than generous and the price is right.

Cuisine: Seafood

Make a stop at the Harlem School of Arts while in the neighborhood. The school is a cultural destination in Harlem presenting dance, music and theatrical productions. Hamilton Grange is a short walk away. It’s the only home owned by Alexander Hamilton and offers tours, re-enactments and live music.

Transportation: Bus—M3, BX19. Subway—A, B, C, D to 145th St.

Features

  • More than 360 entries with over 2000 photographs
  • This visually rich app consists of detailed New York City visitor’s information from visitor centers, tourist websites, weather, news, holidays, sales tax, smoking rules, tipping and transportation to and from airports and in the city
  • Detailed descriptions which include uncommonly known cultural and historical facts, websites, phone numbers, hours of operation, prices, menus and hyperlinks that link entries and lead to websites for additional historical and factual information.
  • Entries sorted by name, category, distance, price, and neighborhood
  • Once click to websites, phones, online ordering, online reservations, current menus and more
  • Live calendar
  • Ability to share user comments and mark and save favorites
  • Ask the authors questions through in-app comments to get personalized feedback at your finger tips
  • YouTube videos
  • GPS enabled Google maps with walking, driving and mass transit directions
  • Access offline content anytime
  • Free upgrades for life

What’s inside

  • Nightlife and entertainment from jazz, Latin salsa, opera to classical music;
  • Theatre, dance, spoken word and more;
  • Restaurants featuring soul food to French cuisine and everything in between;
  • Unique ethnic retail shops;
  • Museums that celebrate various cultures;
  • Fine art galleries;
  • Majestic churches and gospel music;
  • Amazing landmarks;
  • Parks and free recreational activities;
  • Guest accommodations;
  • Free internet access and Wi-fi locations;
  • Authentic tours of Harlem;
  • Annual events and festivals;
  • Sales & Deals

   Literally a guide in my pocket

Posted by Max on 13th Jan 2012

I can only subscribe to what other people already have told about the guide. It’s just great that I can read a place description, actually give a call its manager, find it on a map and even hook up on its Twitter channel to keep my eye on it. Very smart!

Download the free Sutro World @ www.sutromedia.com/world and purchase the Harlem Travel Guide today for $2.99!

Follow Welcome to Harlem on:

Website www.welcometoharlem.com
Facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Welcome-to-Harlem/464732145003
Twitterhttps://twitter.com/welcometoharlem
Yelphttp://www.yelp.com/biz/welcome-to-harlem-new-york
Trip Advisorhttp://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d1977036-Reviews-Welcome_to_Harlem-New_York_City_New_York.html
Blogwww.welcometoharlem.wordpress.com

St. Nicholas Park – Harlem Travel Guide – Sutro World

There’s year round activity here

St. Nicholas Park is located at the intersection of two Harlem neighborhoods – Hamilton Heights and Manhattanville. The nearly 23-acre park is situated between 128th and 141st Streets and St. Nicholas Avenue and St. Nicholas Terrace. Some of the land for the park was acquired upon the condemnation of the Croton Aqueduct in 1895, and the additional property was assembled between 1900 and 1909, which included the area at 128th Street known as “The Point of Rocks,” where General George Washington had positioned himself during the Battle of Harlem Heights in 1776. The name of the park is taken from adjacent streets St. Nicholas Terrace to the west and St. Nicholas Avenue to the east. These streets honor New Amsterdam patron saint St. Nicholas of Myra, whose likeness adorned the masthead of the New Netherland ship that brought the first Dutch settlers to New Amsterdam, and who is the inspiration for Father Christmas or Santa Claus. Landscape architect and Parks Commissioner Samuel Parsons designed the park himself. The park was built on a rugged mass of Manhattan schist following the steep and irregular topography of northern Manhattan. The imposing and Gothic-inspired City College of New York campus overlooks the park. Hamilton Grange, the summer home of our first Secretary of the Treasury and one of the nation’s Founding Fathers, Alexander Hamilton, was moved from nearby Convent Avenue into the park in 2008.

Facilities: Basketball courts, dog runs, playgrounds, barbecue area, and handball courts.

Now step inside the City College of New York, the “Poor man’s Harvard” campus and marvel at some of New York City’s beautiful Gothic-designed buildings. Then head on down to Harlem Stage Gatehouse for an intimate performing space in the landmarked Croton Aqueduct water system.

Transportation: Bus—M3, M4, M7, M11, M116. Subway—A, B, C, D to 110th, 116th, 125th, 135th, and 145th Sts.

Enjoy the show

Features

  • More than 360 entries with over 2000 photographs
  • This visually rich app consists of detailed New York City visitor’s information from visitor centers, tourist websites, weather, news, holidays, sales tax, smoking rules, tipping and transportation to and from airports and in the city
  • Detailed descriptions which include uncommonly known cultural and historical facts, websites, phone numbers, hours of operation, prices, menus and hyperlinks that link entries and lead to websites for additional historical and factual information.
  • Entries sorted by name, category, distance, price, and neighborhood
  • Once click to websites, phones, online ordering, online reservations, current menus and more
  • Live calendar
  • Ability to share user comments and mark and save favorites
  • Ask the authors questions through in-app comments to get personalized feedback at your finger tips
  • YouTube videos
  • GPS enabled Google maps with walking, driving and mass transit directions
  • Access offline content anytime
  • Free upgrades for life

What’s inside

  • Nightlife and entertainment from jazz, Latin salsa, opera to classical music;
  • Theatre, dance, spoken word and more;
  • Restaurants featuring soul food to French cuisine and everything in between;
  • Unique ethnic retail shops;
  • Museums that celebrate various cultures;
  • Fine art galleries;
  • Majestic churches and gospel music;
  • Amazing landmarks;
  • Parks and free recreational activities;
  • Guest accommodations;
  • Free internet access and Wi-fi locations;
  • Authentic tours of Harlem;
  • Annual events and festivals;
  • Sales & Deals

Literally a guide in my pocket    

Posted by Max on 13th Jan 2012

I can only subscribe to what other people already have told about the guide. It’s just great that I can read a place description, actually give a call its manager, find it on a map and even hook up on its Twitter channel to keep my eye on it. Very smart!

Download the free Sutro World @ www.sutromedia.com/world and purchase the Harlem Travel Guide today for $2.99!

Follow Welcome to Harlem on:

Website www.welcometoharlem.com
Facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Welcome-to-Harlem/464732145003
Twitterhttps://twitter.com/welcometoharlem
Yelphttp://www.yelp.com/biz/welcome-to-harlem-new-york
Trip Advisorhttp://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d1977036-Reviews-Welcome_to_Harlem-New_York_City_New_York.html
Blogwww.welcometoharlem.wordpress.com

St. Mark’s United Methodist Church- Harlem Travel Guide – Sutro Media

We made three stops before we built our Home

St. Mark’s United Methodist Church traveled a long way from the Tenderloin in Midtown, to San Juan Hill on the Upper West Side, and to its current home in Harlem. Throughout its journey, monumental achievements happened along the way. Founded in 1871, out of Mother A.M.E. Zion Church in Philadelphia, PA by William F. Butler, the church’s first location was at 65 W. 35th Street, the site of the former Church of the Resurrection. Then it moved to its second home on the Upper West Side at 139 W. 48th St., the former All Souls’ Church. The next stop was at 231 W. 53rd Street, the former St. John’s Methodist and remained there until 1926. The last and final stop for this house of worship was built by Sibley & Fetherston between 1921-1926. This majestic church sits between Edgecombe and St. Nicholas Avenues with St. Nicholas Park as a magnificent backdrop. The yellowish sandstone Gothic inspired church glimmers when the sun hits it and is truly a wonderful structure.

During the course of St. Mark’s journey to find a permanent home, the church was laying a strong foundation in the community and was able to achieve the following – it was the first to form a literary forum for all denominations, first African-American church to become a full member of a white annual conference, first African-American congregation to build a church costing more than a half million dollars, and to have two of its pastors appointed as district superintendent. St. Mark’s was fortunate enough to have had two strong visionary leaders at the helm of their Church – Reverends Brooks and Hicks. The Rev. Brooks is a founder of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the National Urban League, and Rev. Dr. John J. Hicks, who commenced his relationship with the church in 1964, was also associated with the NAACP and the Harlem Branch of the Young Men’s Christian Association, and was involved in community service in other ways, as well.

Stroll over to Hamilton Grange, the estate of Alexander Hamilton named after his ancestral estate in Scotland. Recently renovated and located in St. Nicholas Park, guided tours of this national landmark are available. The Harlem School of the Arts is a must stop for theatrical, music and dance productions by students with promise in these disciplines.

Transportation: Bus—M3, BX33. Subway—B, C  to 135th St.

Features

  • More than 360 entries with over 2000 photographs
  • This visually rich app consists of detailed New York City visitor’s information from visitor centers, tourist websites, weather, news, holidays, sales tax, smoking rules, tipping and transportation to and from airports and in the city
  • Detailed descriptions which include uncommonly known cultural and historical facts, websites, phone numbers, hours of operation, prices, menus and hyperlinks that link entries and lead to websites for additional historical and factual information.
  • Entries sorted by name, category, distance, price, and neighborhood
  • Once click to websites, phones, online ordering, online reservations, current menus and more
  • Live calendar
  • Ability to share user comments and mark and save favorites
  • Ask the authors questions through in-app comments to get personalized feedback at your finger tips
  • YouTube videos
  • GPS enabled Google maps with walking, driving and mass transit directions
  • Access offline content anytime
  • Free upgrades for life

Thank you !  

Posted by Ryan Morrison on 20th Jan 2012

I’ve been traveling a lot and used many Sutro guides but the this one is one of the best so far.

More Reviews

Download the free Sutro World @ www.sutromedia.com/world and purchase the in-app Harlem Travel Guide today for $2.99!

Follow Welcome to Harlem on:

Website – www.welcometoharlem.com
Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Welcome-to-Harlem/464732145003
Twitter – https://twitter.com/welcometoharlem
Yelp – http://www.yelp.com/biz/welcome-to-harlem-new-york
Trip Advisor – http://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d1977036-Reviews-Welcome_to_Harlem-New_York_City_New_York.html
Blog – www.welcometoharlem.wordpress.com

Harlem – Historic Home on the Grange

The Hamilton Grange, the upper Manhattan house built by Alexander Hamilton, reopened to the public in September after a half-century of work. that included a relocation.

Owners of historic property regularly complain about dealing with government landmark agencies, which can be sticklers for keeping New York’s great buildings looking the same for the ages.

These critics can take some consolation by looking at the recent rehabilitation of Hamilton Grange, the upper Manhattan house built by founding father Alexander Hamilton. It shows just how persnickety a preservation project can be.

The story dates to 1962 when Congress agreed to give historic monument status to the house on the condition that the National Park Service relocate the building and recreate Hamilton’s vision of a country retreat in Harlem away from the bustle of the city. Nearly a half-century later, the job is done: The Park Service went as far as spending $14.5 million to jack the house up more than 40 feet and roll it down the road from its previous location, a cramped lot on Convent Avenue, so that the view from the porch more resembles what Alexander Hamilton saw when he walked on it more than two centuries ago.

The sitting room with the original piano .

The house, which has museum displays on the ground floor and a recreation of its original interiors above, reopened to the public in September, and from an architectural and landmark perspective is an exciting, fascinating success. Walking south along St. Nicholas Avenue from the B train stop, one turns the corner at 141st, starts westward up the hill, and is suddenly transported back when Harlem’s map was spotted with country estates, streams, fields, farms and hunting grounds.

Other historic redevelopments, of course, don’t have to go through this kind of scrutiny because landmark agencies give commercial projects more latitude. Last week, for example, the city Landmarks Preservation Commission indicated it was close to approving developer Jared Kushner’s plan to build a glass penthouse on top of the landmark Puck Building in SoHo.

Earlier plans by Mr. Kushner were rejected because the changes would have been too visible. The latest version “has calmed down,” Frederick Bland, an architect and one of the commissioners said last week.

A scale reproduction of the house

A trip to Hamilton Grange is a reminder why it’s important to do this. In the middle of a dense, highly residential part of central Harlem known as Hamilton Heights now sits a genteel, federal-style pinewood cottage, with peach siding and thin, graceful white columns framing its veranda, overlooking the park’s sloping swath of green.

The original architect was famed Federal-style designer John McComb Jr., who also was the architect of Gracie Mansion and New York’s City Hall. Mr. McComb built at the nadir of the Federal period of architecture, which, like the Georgian before it, suggested an American style based on the classical proportions of ancient Greece, but which lightened its architectural elements, adding graceful flourishes and swapping smooth stone and wood materials for heavy Georgian bricks.

Hamilton Grange is a shining example of the style. Built with an almost aggressive symmetry—Mr. McComb added two non-functional chimneys to the building just to balance out its roof, and the interior lobby presents the anteroom and the dining hall as mirror images of one another, arranged around a bust of Hamilton himself—the house suggests a rationality that isn’t accidental.

The Founding Fathers sought to express their sense of Enlightenment-era logic in everything they did, from the Constitution to the houses in which they entertained.

Hamilton Grange’s new home isn’t the original site of its construction, which was near where 143rd hits Amsterdam Avenue today, and because of encroaching street grid and the development of Harlem, couldn’t be. Its front entrance no longer faces southward, as the original did, and some of the original conditions on the interior were impossible to re-create, because historians couldn’t divine the intentions of Mr. McComb.

“What’s important to a historian is to try to get history right, or as close to right as you can, whether it’s writing a book, making a film, or relocating a house,” says Steve Laise, chief of cultural resources for the National Park Service’s Manhattan branch. “In its former location, it looked like nothing at all, the way it was crowded in … The reality of what the home is now is much close to its historical reality. It’s about honoring Hamilton’s intent.”

Historical architects have restored the house’s front and back porches, which were lost in the Convent Avenue location, giving the cottage, which is actually quite small, a bit of the sprawling affect of a country estate.

On the location question, the Park Service has made the best out of a bad situation. Mr. Laise says the National Park Service considered at least four sites for the house, including Central Park, Riverside Park, the south part of the City College campus, and near the Dyckman farmhouse in Inwood. It settled on the current location because, among other reasons, it is within the footprint of Hamilton’s original, 33-acre estate.

Another effect of the relocation is that the house gives new purpose to a public park: a conduit to history. Park planners have long worried that St. Nicholas Park, a 23-acre swath of green that runs north-to-south alongside the campus of City College of New York, had become a dodgy no-man’s-land after daylight hours and had been looking to add more positive, public use to it.

Alexander Hamilton lived in the Grange for only two years: The house was completed in 1802, and he was killed in 1804. But thanks to good planning and the National Park Service’s right-sized sense of the importance of historical architecture, Hamilton’s version of New York City lives again.

Tasting the Sweetness in Hamilton Heights

 

Upper Manhattan’s Hamilton Heights derives its name from its most famous early inhabitant, Alexander Hamilton, who bought land in the area in 1799. At that time most of Upper Manhattan was still rural, and it wasn’t till the 1880s that the neighborhood’s stately townhomes began to be built for well-to-do white residents.

By 1919, the northern section of Hamilton Heights was beginning to be referred to as Sugar Hill, where “life is sweet.” The area rose to fame during the 1930s when a wave of black professionals moved in. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, the novelist Ralph Ellison and jazz legends such as Charlie Parker all called the neighborhood home around this time.

The neighborhood, which lies in the western portion of Harlem just south of Washington Heights, hit rough patches in the decades following. During the 1980s, many residents fled as crime surged in surrounding parts of Harlem.

“Nobody wanted to live here,” said Willie Kathryn Suggs, a broker who has lived in Hamilton Heights since 1985.

Crime in the area never reached the levels seen in other parts of Harlem, Ms. Suggs said, but it did make property cheap. She bought her office in the neighborhood at the time for about $50,000, she said.

Now the townhomes of Hamilton Heights, many of which are in a landmarked historical district, are the properties that are in most demand, Ms. Suggs said.

Of the 84 residences currently listed for sale on real-estate site StreetEasy.com, the median asking price is $537,000. The median price a square foot is $458. In Central Harlem, it is $571 a square foot, and in neighboring Washington Heights, it is $427, according to StreetEasy.

The area has several large parks.

 

On West 147th Street, there is a four-story townhouse built in 1901 that was renovated five years ago. The stoop was rebuilt, the antique doors and railings were restored and new windows were installed.

The rust-colored townhome, with four bedrooms and three bathrooms, measures 3,200 square feet, is currently on the market for $2 million.

On Convent Avenue there is a two-family townhouse on the market for $1.21 million, listed by Ms. Suggs. It’s one of a row of 10 limestone townhomes built around the turn of the century. It has five original fireplaces, original window and door moldings and a private garden. There are six bedrooms and five bathrooms in the four-story home.

Unlike other areas of Harlem, there wasn’t much available land for new development in recent years. But a handful of new condo buildings have been constructed.

On West 136th Street, Gold Development built a six-floor, 29-unit condo building in 2006. That sold out in four months, said Romy Goldman, founder and president of Gold Development.

On Edgecombe Avenue, Gold Development built a 12-unit, six-floor condo building in 2009 called Hamilton Lofts.

Each unit has its own floor with elevators that open up directly in each condo. There is one unit left there listed at $624,000.

One of the neighborhood’s drawbacks is a lack of retail outlets. There are several banks and pharmacies in the area, but for many other types of retail needs, residents have to travel down to 125th Street. Sit-down restaurants are also far and few between.

 

Schools: Hamilton Heights’ public schools are in District 6. They include A. Philip Randolph Campus High School, Hamilton Heights School and New Heights Academy Charter School.

Other schools in the district include P.S. 325 and Twenty-First Century Academy for Community Leadership.

In 2010, 43% of District 6 students in grades three through eight received a proficient score on the math exam, and 29.4% of students received a proficient score on the English Language Arts exam. In 2006, the results were 44.8% for math and 37.8% for reading.

Private schools in the neighborhood include Our Lady of Lourdes School, which runs from nursery school through eight grade, and Dorothy Day Early Childhood Center.

 

Parks: St. Nicholas Park, measuring about 23 acres, is one of three large parks in Hamilton Heights or adjacent to it. A portion of the St. Nicholas Park was the site of where George Washington fought during the battle of Harlem Heights in 1776.

The park was later designed by landscape architect Samuel Parsons Jr. and was constructed in 1906. Now it has areas for barbecuing, basketball and handball courts, playgrounds and dog runs.

On the banks of the Hudson River is Riverbank State Park, which has indoor and outdoor facilities spread over 28 acres. It has an ice rink, gymnasium, tennis courts and an Olympic-size pool. There are also basketball courts, a softball field and a football and soccer field.

Nearby is Jackie Robinson Park, which was originally called Colonial Park and was renamed for the Brooklyn Dodger legend in 1978. The park, which measures about 13 acres, has baseball fields, basketball courts, playgrounds, and pools.

 

Entertainment: Hamilton Heights is home to Harlem Stage at City College. The arts organization features music, dance theater and cinema.

Also in Hamilton Heights is the Dance Theater of Harlem, which offers training and also hosts performances.

 

Shopping: Just outside the neighborhood on Frederick Douglass Boulevard is Hue-Man Bookstore and Café, which hosts several readings.

Also on Frederick Douglass Boulevard is the bike shop MODSquad Cycles.

To the south of Hamilton Heights on 125th Street is Harlem’s main shopping strip with shops such as H&M, Marshalls and others.

 

Dining: Just south of Hamilton Heights is Pisticci, which serves Italian cuisine. Marcus Samuelsson of “Top Chef” fame recently opened the comfort-food restaurant Red Rooster on nearby Lenox Avenue.

And for chicken and waffles and other soul-food dishes, there is Amy Ruth’s on 116th Street.

Write to Joseph De Avila at joseph.deavila@wsj.com