Life’s Women

June 28, 2019 – October 6, 2019

For the editors of LIFE—the first magazine to tell stories with photographs rather than text—the camera was not merely a reporter, but also a potent commentator with the power to frame news and events for a popular audience. For decades, Americans saw the world through the lens of the magazine’s photographers. Yet between the 1930s and the early 1970s, LIFE kept only six women photographers on staff. LIFE’s Women features more than 80 images showcasing the extraordinary work created by those six staff photographers: Margaret Bourke-White, Hansel Mieth, Marie Hansen, Martha Holmes, Nina Leen, and Lisa Larsen.

How were these women part of a larger editorial vision? What topics did they cover, and how did their work reflect—and sometimes expand—the mission of the magazine? The exhibit reveals these photographers’ important role in creating modern photojournalism and defining what LIFE editor-in-chief Henry Luce called the “American Century.” Curated by Sarah Gordon, curatorial scholar in women’s history, Center for Women’s History, and Marilyn Satin Kushner, curator and head, Department of Prints, Photographs, and Architectural Collections; with Erin Levitsky, Ryerson University; and William J. Simmons, Andrew Mellon Foundation Pre-Doctoral Fellow, Center for Women’s History.

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Location
New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West at 77th Street
New York NY 10024 US

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Crusader: Martin Luther King Jr. – Exhibition Opening Reception

January 15, 2019 5:00pm – 7:00pm

Join us for the official opening of Crusader: Martin Luther King Jr. in the Latimer/Edison Gallery.

Crusader: Martin Luther King Jr. is a Schomburg Center Capsule Exhibition of archival photography from the Photographs & Prints Division. The exhibition presents an intimate photo travelogue of King’s pilgrimage to India, Nobel Peace Prize acceptance in Oslo, Norway, and his work as a non-violent crusader for civil rights captured by select photographers of the day. Crusader Without Violence by Dr. L. D. Reddick is the first biography about Martin Luther King, Jr. published in 1959. This exhibition coincides 60th anniversary of its publication.

Photo: Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Photographs and Prints Division, The New York Public Library. “Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and his wife Coretta being greeted by Rev. Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. (left) and labor leader A. Philip Randolph (right) at the Pan American World Airways terminal, in New York City” The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1950 – 1959.

FIRST COME, FIRST SEATED
Events are free and open to all, but due to space constraints registration is requested. We generally overbook to ensure a full house. Registered guests are given priority check-in 15 to 30 minutes before start time. After the event starts all registered seats are released regardless of registration, so we recommend that you arrive early.

More Info: 

Location
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
515 Malcolm X Boulevard at 135th Street
New York NY 10037 US

Art of Native America: The Charles and Valerie Diker Collection

October 4, 2018 – October 6, 2019

This landmark exhibition in the Museum’s American Wing showcases 116 masterworks representing the achievements of artists from more than fifty cultures across North America. Ranging in date from the second to the early twentieth century, the diverse works are promised gifts, donations, and loans to The Met from the pioneering collectors Charles and Valerie Diker. Long considered to be the most significant holdings of historical Native American art in private hands, the Diker Collection has particular strengths in sculpture from British Columbia and Alaska, California baskets, pottery from southwestern pueblos, Plains drawings and regalia, and rare accessories from the eastern Woodlands.

Accompanied by a catalogue.

#ArtofNativeAmerica

Price: Exhibitions are free with Museum admission.

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Location
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York NY 10028 US

Between the Lines: Crusader Without Violence with Dr. Derryn Moten

January 15, 2019 7:00pm – 9:00pm

Lawrence Dunbar Reddick was an African American scholar, historian, and activist, and was named the second curator of the Schomburg Collection of Negro Literature after Arturo Schomburg’s death in 1939. In 1959, Reddick wrote Crusader without Violence: A Biography of Martin Luther King, Jr., the first profile of the young leader before his rise to global prominence as a civil rights icon.

Join us as we celebrate the 60th Anniversary Edition of Crusader without Violence as it returns to circulation with new biographical details on Reddick, and a special introduction by Dr. Derryn Moten, professor of history and department chair at Alabama State University.

This program coincides with the official opening of Crusader: Martin Luther King Jr. in the Latimer Edison Gallery.

FIRST COME, FIRST SEATED
Events are free and open to all, but due to space constraints registration is requested. We generally overbook to ensure a full house. Registered guests are given priority check-in 15 to 30 minutes before start time. After the event starts all registered seats are released regardless of registration, so we recommend that you arrive early.

More Info:

Location
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
515 Malcolm X Boulevard at 135th Street
New York NY 10037 US

The Schomburg Center’s 7th Annual Black Comic Book Festival

The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture invites comic book fans of all ages to participate in its 7th Annual Black Comic Book Festival.

The festival will be held on Friday, January 18 from 12 PM – 7:30PM and on Saturday, January 19 from 10 AM to 7:30PM. Registration for both days is free and is open to the public.

Each year, the Schomburg’s Black Comic Book Festival brings creators, illustrators, writers, and independent publishers together with thousands of collectors, blerds and nerds for two days of programming and activities. The highly-anticipated community event includes interactive panel discussions, a vendor marketplace featuring exclusive titles by Black creators, a cosplay show, and more.

Black Comic Book Festival participants are encouraged to wear their favorite cosplay costumes and to register on-site for the annual cosplay show. Participants are also invited to contribute to the Schomburg Center’s growing collection of Black independent comic books by bringing single copies of old or new titles from their home collection. All donations will become a part of the Schomburg’s unique and growing archive documenting Black comix and the Black speculative arts movement.

The Schomburg Center’s 7th Annual Black Comic Book Festival art was created by Edgardo Miranda-Rodriguez (@mredgardonyc), writer & creator of @LaBorinquenaComics.

For festival updates, follow the Schomburg Center on Twitter and Instagram @SchomburgCenter, #BlackComicBookFest.

Festival Schedule

Friday, January 18

Schomburg Center – Langston Hughes Auditorium

Program 1: 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Little Apple
Sci-Fi/Drama Comic & Series
Screening, Discussion and Q&A

11:15 am – 12:00 pm
Creating Black Fantasy
Presentation and Q&A

Program 2: 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm
Fear of Black Planet
Panel Discussion and Q&A

Program 3: 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
#FortheCulture: New York City in Comics
Panel Discussion and Q&A

Program 4: 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm
AfroPuertorriqueños: Cultural & Social Activism in Comics
Panel Discussion and Q&A

Saturday, January 19

Schomburg Center – Langston Hughes Auditorium

Program 1: 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Supervillians: A Reflection of Us
Panel Discussion and Q&A

Program 2: 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Animating History: Comics and Archives/Historical Records
Presentation, Panel Discussion and Q&A

Program 3: 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Kickstarter Presentation
Presentation and Q&A

Program 4: 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Cosplay Showcase

Program 5: 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Curating Comics & Creators of Color
Panel Discussion and Q&A

Program 6: 6:30pm – 7:30 pm
Scripting Our Stories: Black Women Writers in Comics
Panel Discussion and Q&A

Youth Programming at Countee Cullen Library
Auditorium (Lower Level)
Saturday, January 19

Program 1: 10:30 am – 11:15 am
Saturday Morning Cartoons

  • Little Apple by Riley Wilson
  • Heroes of Color by David Heredia

Program 2: 12:00 pm – 1: 00pm
How to Draw Comics Workshop
Presentation and Hands-on Workshop

Program 3: 2:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Coloring Stations and Superhero Storytime
Presentation and Hands-on Workshop

FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED
Events are free and open to all, but due to space constraints registration is requested. We generally overbook to ensure a full house. After the event starts all registered seats are released regardless of registration, so we recommend that you arrive early.

More Info: 

Location
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
515 Malcolm X Boulevard at 135th Street
New York NY 10037 US

Betye Saar: Keepin’ It Clean

Betye Saar: Keepin’ It Clean 

November 02, 2018 – May 27, 2019

Contemporary artist Betye Saar has shaped the development of assemblage art in the United States, particularly as a device to illuminate social and political concerns. A key figure in the Black Arts Movement and the feminist art movement of the 1960-70s, Saar’s distinct vision harmonizes the personal and the political. Over the years, Saar has transformed the representation of African Americans in American culture by recycling and reclaiming derogatory images such as Aunt Jemimas, Uncle Toms, sambos, and mammies to confront the continued racism in American society and create representations of strength and perseverance. This exhibition focuses on one facet of her work—washboards—created between 1997 and 2017. Presented in the Joyce B. Cowin Women’s History Gallery, part of the Center for Women’s History, the exhibition is organized by the Craft and Folk Art Museum, Los Angeles.

Exhibitions at New-York Historical are made possible by Dr. Agnes Hsu-Tang and Oscar Tang, the Saunders Trust for American History, the Seymour Neuman Endowed Fund, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. WNET is the media sponsor.

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Cost: $21 for adults, $16 for seniors, $13 for high school or college students, and $6 for kids from 5 -13 years of age.

Location
New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West at 77th Street
New York NY 10024 US

Female Remedies

November 2, 2018 – May 27, 2019 10am – 6pm

Unregulated “patent medicines” were big business before the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906 forced manufacturers to list ingredients. Limited birth control and illegal abortion drove women to buy pills and powders that promised to “restore and regulate menstrual function.” Meanwhile syrups secretly loaded with alcohol and morphine were sold to mothers, who were persuaded that happy babies were quiet. This small installation shows how these products were shrewdly marketed to women desperate to conform to social rules.

Exhibitions at New-York Historical are made possible by Dr. Agnes Hsu-Tang and Oscar Tang, the Saunders Trust for American History, the Seymour Neuman Endowed Fund, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. WNET is the media sponsor.

More Info:

Location
New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West at 77th Street
New York NY 10024 US

Witnesses to History: African American Voting Rights

November 15, 2018 – April 28, 2019

African American Voting Rights explores the struggle of African Americans to gain access to the franchise in the century after the Civil War ended. The abolition of slavery was just the beginning of a long, difficult, and sometimes dangerous fight for civil rights, including voting rights, for African Americans. Although the 15th Amendment forbade discrimination based on race, state and local governments established laws that effectively prevented African Americans from voting. Violence and intimidation on the part of white citizens further obstructed black voting rights. This installation features materials from the Gilder Lehrman Collection that document the fight for voting rights through the enactment of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Among the highlights are letters written by Frederick Douglass and Martin Luther King Jr., two leaders in the fight for civil rights; reports on voter suppression in the South and one by Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy on the federal actions taken to combat such discrimination; images of the black U.S. senators and representatives elected during Reconstruction; an evocative photograph from the March from Selma to Montgomery in 1965; and a broadside encouraging African Americans to register to vote in 1965.

Exhibitions at New-York Historical are made possible by Dr. Agnes Hsu-Tang and Oscar Tang, the Saunders Trust for American History, the Seymour Neuman Endowed Fund, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. WNET is the media sponsor.

More Info: 

Location
New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West at 77th Street
New York NY 10024 US

Currents: Basse Terre by Simone Leigh

Ongoing

To showcase New-York Historical’s continuing tradition of collecting art and objects in the present day, the Museum is proud to display recent acquisitions in Currents, on view on the first floor.

The Brooklyn-based artist Simone Leigh draws upon forms, techniques, and visual cues from across Africa and its diaspora—the communities of descendants scattered around the globe—to reflect on continuity and change. The title of the bust on view refers to one of the Guadeloupe islands in the Caribbean. One of Leigh’s central themes is the black female body as a “repository of lived experience” containing strength, knowledge, and healing wisdom. Here, the body’s beehive shape and textured surface reference the traditional mud dwellings made by the Musgum people of Cameroon and Chad. The eyeless features suggest an inner life that we, the viewers, cannot fully apprehend.

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Location
New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West at 77th Street
New York NY 10024 US

Women’s Voices

Ongoing

A highlight of the Center for Women’s History, Women’s Voices is a multimedia digital installation where visitors can discover the hidden connections among exceptional and unknown women who left their mark on New York and the nation. Featuring interviews, profiles, and biographies, Women’s Voices unfolds across nine oversized touchscreens to tell the story of activists, scientists, performers, athletic champions, social change advocates, writers, and educators through video, audio, music, text, and images.

Among the many fascinating profiles featured in Women’s Voices are those of the first Latina Supreme Court Justice, Sonia Sotomayor; Nobel Prize-winning scientist Barbara McClintock; civil rights activist and poet Audre Lorde; the first woman to receive a medical degree in the U.S., Elizabeth Blackwell; award-winning actressElizabeth Blackwell; Brooklyn-born opera star Beverly Sills; Seneca leader and artisan Caroline Parker Mountpleasant; trailblazing dancer and principal ballerina Misty Copeland; the Manhattan Project physicist who was snubbed by the Nobel Prize committee, Chien-Shiung Wu; Gilded Age novelist Edith Wharton; and the teacher whose 1854 lawsuit helped desegregate public transit in New York, Elizabeth Jennings Graham, among others.

More Info: 

Location
New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West at 77th Street
New York NY 10024 US