Bale Folclorico da Bahia-Professional Folk Dance Company from Brazil

Sunday, February 19, 2017 | 4:00pm – 6:00pm

bale_folclorico_da_bahia_Balé Folclórico da Bahia, the only professional folk dance company in Brazil, was formed in 1988 by Walson Botelho and Ninho Reis. Based in Salvador in the northern state of Bahia, and under the leadership of artistic director José Carlos Arandiba, the 32-member troupe of dancers, musicians, and singers performs a repertory that originates from Bahian folkloric dances of African origin and includes slave dances, capoeira, samba, and those that celebrate Carnival. The company highlights the region’s culture within a contemporary theatrical vision. Balé Folclórico da Bahia made its European debut in 1992 when it participated in Berlin’s Alexander Platz International Festival and drew an audience of 50,000. Its US debut tour was in 1995—96 and it has since performed in 88 US cities, earning rave reviews and playing to sold-out houses.

Cost: Tickets: $40, $35, $25; Children 12 & under $10 any seat.

Contact: Lehman Center for the Performing Arts

Email: lehmancenterPAC@gmail.com Phone: 718-960-8833

More Info: http://lehmancenter.org/events/bale-folclorico-da-bahia/

Location: Lehman Center for the Performing Arts, 250 Bedford Park Boulevard West Bronx New York 10468

Education at the Schomburg: Black Lives Matter Teen Conference

February 18, 2017 | 10:00am – 12:00pm

blmThe Schomburg Junior Scholars invite youth (grades 5-12) from across the city to join them for a day long teen conference exploring the impact of the Black Lives Matter Movement on the youth of today. The day will include activist teach-ins, youth-led panel discussions, teen performances, and interactive arts and media workshops. This event is presented in collaboration with Schomburg Education’s Conversations in Black Freedom Studies series and the Junior Scholars Program.

COST: FREE.  Registration via SchomburgCenter.Eventbrite.com RSVP. First come, first seated. For free events, we generally overbook to ensure a full house. All registered seats are released 15 to 30 minutes before start time, so we recommend that you arrive early.  Guests: Please note that holding seats in the Langston Hughes Auditorium is strictly prohibited and there is no food or drinks allowed anywhere in the Schomburg Center.

More Info: https://www.nypl.org/events/programs/2017/02/18/black-lives-matter-teen-conference

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

515 Malcolm X Boulevard at 135th Street New York NY 10037 US

 

Valentine Serenade at MIST Harlem

Tuesday, February 14, 2017 | 6:00pm – 11:00pm

valentines_dayG&J Productions in collaboration with MIST Harlem invites you to an evening of romantic music, delectable cuisine and dancing.

A DINNER SHOW featuring:  Vincent Gardner (J@LC lead trombonist),  Belinda Munro, Songstress with The Nat Adderley Jr. Trio.

3-COURSE DINNER:

Appetizers:  Jumbo Pholourie Shrimp, Watercress, Sorrel, Chadon Beni aioli, Kale Caesar Salad, braised pear, Parmesan, garlic herb croutons.

Entrées:  Spice Isle Chicken, Blackened Salmon, Sweet Cola Beef Ribs, Quinoa stuffed Acorn Squash.  Sides: Rice and Peas; Roasted Garlic and Thyme Mashed Potatoes.

Vegetables:  Sauteed Broccolini and Sweet Plantains

Dessert to Share (for two):  Red Velvet Brownie Sundae, Fudge, Peanuts, Cherries, Harlem Cheese Cake, Caramel and Berries

After Dinner Dance Groove with Dj Raw Kiss

Seating: 6pm & 8:30pm Transportation: #2 or #3 train to 116th St; Buses: #7 and #102 to 116th Street and Malcolm X Blvd and #1 bus to 116th and Fifth Avenue.

COST: $88 per person for the Dinner, Show & Dancing; $74 per person for Dinner & Show; and $20 per person for Dancing Only.  Reservations: mistharlem.com eventsodyssey.com Eventbrite Information: 855.963.9773

Contact: Jewel Kinch – Thomas Email: gjproductionsinc@gmail.com Phone: 917-536-6504 More Info: http://www.eventsodyssey.com/valentine-serenade/

MIST Harlem 46 West 116th Street btwn Malcolm X Blvd and Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10026 USA

 

Get In the Way: The Journey of John Lewis

Wednesday, February 15, 2017 | 6:30pm – 8:30pm

john-lewis“Sometimes you have to disturb people’s sense of tranquility and create a little noise,” according to Congressman John Lewis.  This documentary, which began production 20 years ago, shows the lasting influences on Lewis’s commitment to social justice, human rights, and civil rights. His leadership at the age of 23 in 1963 inspired the activism of some of today’s key figures, including Arva Rice, President and CEO of the New York Urban League (NYUL). Following the screening, Rice will be in conversation with the next generation of organizers and activists. Co-presented with the New York Urban League. @SchomburgCenter #GetInTheWay.

COST: FREE. First come, first seated. For free events, we generally overbook to ensure a full house. All registered seats are released 15 to 30 minutes before start time, so we recommend that you arrive early. Guests: Please note that holding seats in the Langston Hughes Auditorium is strictly prohibited and there is no food or drinks allowed anywhere in the Schomburg Center.

More Info: https://www.nypl.org/events/programs/2017/02/15/films-schomburg-get-way-journey-john-lewis

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture – 515 Malcolm X Boulevard at 135th Street New York NY 10037 US

“Dear President: What You Need To Know About Race”

January 26, 2017 | 7:00pm – 8:30pm

president-race“Dear President: What You Need To Know About Race” is WNYC’s post-election series of first-person radio essays by leading black thinkers, writers and activists exploring a broad range of personal truths about being black in America to help set a new agenda for racial equality.

Join us for an evening of micro-conversations, hosted by WNYC’s Rebecca Carroll, featuring a stand-up comedy performance by Khalid Rahmaan.

CONVERSATIONS LINEUP:

Micro-Conversation 1: That Extra Work We Do As Black Folks

Inspired by Damon Young’s essay, “Nigga Neurosis,” Kevin Young, Poet and Director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and Bayete Ross Smith, photographer and multimedia/video artist, on how black folks do the most and whether we deserve a seat at the table.

Micro-Conversation 2: Hope Just Got Real

Journalist at The Intercept, Liliana Segura, in conversation with Chris Stone, President of the Open Society Foundations, on facing an already failed criminal justice system under a Trump administration– as inspired by Theo Shaw’s essay, “An Uncomfortable Hope.”

Micro-Conversation 3: Who We Be in America

Inspired by Kirsten West Savali’s essay “The American Dream,” composer Vijay Iyer joins Yvonne Thevenot, Founder and Executive Director of STEM Kids NYC, on the American Dream, who has access to it, and who does not. And how we will continue to encourage science and art moving forward. Ensemble Q/A. All conversationalists.

@SchomburgCenter #DearPresident. Guests. Please note that there is no food or drinks allowed anywhere in the Schomburg Center.  Cost: $10 for General Public. FREE for Schomburg Society Members.

Location: Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, 515 Malcolm X Boulevard at 135th Street, New York NY 10037

More Info: https://www.nypl.org/events/programs/2017/01/26/dear-president-what-you-need-know-about-race-america

 

From Timbuktu to Timbuctoo: A Workshop for Teachers

January 30, 2017 | 9:00am – 12:00pm  

timbuktuTimbuktu, Mali: A famous center of Islamic learning from the 13th to the 17th century. Timbuctoo, New Jersey: A village founded in 1826 by free African Americans and runaways.

Between Timbuktu and Timbuctoo: centuries of slave trade and slavery, and resistance to both. The West African empires of Mali and Songhai, including the city of Timbuktu, form a part of New York State’s core curriculum “World History” and “Geography” (units 2 and 3) and New York City’s core curriculum in “Global History and Geography” (units 5 and 6) as do the Transatlantic Slave Trade, rebellions and resistance.

In this workshop, teachers of social studies will learn about:

Timbuktu: The goal of this workshop is to excite an interest in the kingdoms of Mali and Songhai, to present core concepts for understanding them and to engage teachers with relevant visual and written primary documents so they can enrich their classrooms.

This session begins with core concepts in both content and pedagogy. We will then view, read and discuss classroom-ready visual and print primary sources. Teachers will also discover the connections between these empires and the European Middle Ages, Renaissance, and the Middle East. Teachers will receive handouts of primary documents, bibliography for classroom learning, including videos and web links for outstanding teaching materials. This session will be led by Dr. Barbara Brown, Director of the public education program at Boston University’s African Studies Center.

Resistance: This session will explore the little known West African strategies against the slave trade, complicating the interpretation of Africans as either victims or accomplices of the slave trade. We will then examine the various modes of resistance of the enslaved communities in America: including runaways’ journeys to southern cities, forests, and swamps and to the North. An overview of revolts–from Hispaniola in 1522 to Nat Turner in 1831–will conclude the session. Teachers will receive books, handouts of relevant texts, and web links to digital exhibitions, lesson plans, and primary documents.

The session will be led by Dr. Sylviane A. Diouf, Director of the Lapidus Center for the Historical Anaylsis of Transatantic Slavery.

Africa in the Americas: Evidence of Africa in the Americas is often hidden in plain sight, available but undiscovered. This session will introduce teachers to the Discover Africa in the Americas website, which maps Africa-related sites in local communities. We will focus on U.S. sites related to Timbuktu and early Muslims in the U.S. Teachers will engage in hands-on activities designed for classroom use and receive handouts related to the website and lessons. This session will be led by Brenda Randolph, Outreach Director at the Center for African Studies at Howard University.

Location:  Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, 515 Malcolm X Boulevard at 135th Street New York NY 10037

REGISTRATION Please Note: Attendance is limited to 35. Priority will be given to Social Studies teachers of relevant grades. Additionally, there are two parts to the registration process. To Complete Registration: 

  1. Register through Eventbrite.
  2. Submit a letter/email from your school supervisor (Principal, AP, etc.) to lapiduscenter@nypl.org stating the grades you teach and that you have permission to attend. Upon receipt of the letter your participation will be confirmed.

Cost: FREE. For free events, we generally overbook to ensure a full house. First come, first seated. All registered seats are released 15 to 30 minutes before start time, so we recommend that you arrive early. Guests, Please note that holding seats is strictly prohibited and there is no food or drinks allowed anywhere in the Schomburg Center.

More Info: https://www.nypl.org/events/programs/2017/01/30/timbuktu-timbuctoo-workshop-teachers

Lapidus Talks @ Noon: The Transatlantic Muslim Diaspora to Latin America in the 19th Century

January 26, 2017 | 12:00pm – 2:00pm

Speaker: Philip Misevich, PhD, Assistant Professor of History at St. John’s University, Lapidus Center Fellow

lapidusAfrican Muslims were present in almost every region of the Americas during the 19th century. The names of Africans rescued from slave ships provide us with valuable clues to their migration patterns across the Atlantic. These data suggest that, at the time while most West Africans came from the bights of Benin and Biafra, the majority of Muslims left from Upper Guinea. @SchomburgCenter  @LapidusCenter  #LapidusTalksAtNoon

Cost: FREE. For free events, we generally overbook to ensure a full house. First come, first seated. All registered seats are released 15 to 30 minutes before start time, so we recommend that you arrive early. Registration via SchomburgCenter.Eventbrite.com

RSVP. Fully accessible to wheelchairs

Location Details: Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, 515 Malcolm X Boulevard at 135th Street, New York NY 10037

More Info: https://www.nypl.org/events/programs/2017/01/26/lapidus-talks-noon-transatlantic-muslim-diaspora-latin-america-19th

Films @ the Schomburg: Birth of a Movement: The Battle Against America’s First Blockbuster

January 31, 2017 | 6:30pm – 8:30pm

birth_of_a_movement_-_film_at_the_schomburgNarrated by actor/director, Danny Glover, “Birth of a Movement” is the largely untold story of African-American newspaperman William Monroe Trotter and filmmaker D.W. Griffith, and their battle over the release of America’s first blockbuster film – Birth of a NationBirth of a Movement is the story of a forgotten turning point in the long struggle for equality, and in recounting the story it explores the conflicts that are still in play as the nation continues to wrestle with its racial legacy.

A talkback with panelists Sam Pollard (New York University film school professor and editor for Spike Lee’s films including Four Little Girls), Dick Lehr (author of the book upon which Birth of a Movement is based and former investigative reporter for the Boston Globe on the Spotlight team), Jelani Cobb (New Yorker contributor and professor at Columbia University), Kwyn Bader (Birth of a Movement co-screenwriter), and Ira Gallen (expert on DW Griffith as well as the owner of a large DW Griffith archive, and author of a recent Griffith biography) will follow the screening.

The conversation will be moderated by Judy Richardson (former member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), producer at Blackside Film & Media, and co-editor of the book, Hands on the Freedom Plow: Personal Accounts of Women in SNCC and an advisor for Birth of a Movement@SchomburgCenter #BirthOfAMovement

Location: Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, 515 Malcolm X Boulevard at 135th Street New York NY 10037

Cost: FREE. Registration via SchomburgCenter.Eventbrite.com

RSVP.  First come, first seated. For free events, we generally overbook to ensure a full house. All registered seats are released 15 to 30 minutes before start time, so we recommend that you arrive early.

Link

 

Black Power 50 Talks: Yohuru Williams and Bryan Shih

January 25, 2017 | 6:30pm – 8:30pm

black-panthersPhotojournalist, Bryan Shih and historian, Yohuru Williams explore the history of the Black Panther Party (BPP), alongside portraits of former Panther members as they are today, in the stunning book, The Black Panthers: Portraits from an Unfinished Revolution. Shih and Williams will share their experiences unearthing less often told stories of rank-and-file BPP members and reflect on the history of the organization. A book signing will follow. Social Media: @SchomburgCenter #BlackPower50.

Cost: FREE. Registration via SchomburgCenter.Eventbrite.com


RSVP. For free events, it’s First Come, First Seated and we generally overbook to ensure a full house. All registered seats are released 15 to 30 minutes before start time, so we recommend that you arrive early. Please note that holding seats in the Langston Hughes Auditorium is strictly prohibited and there is no food or drinks allowed anywhere in the Schomburg Center.

Press – Please send all press inquiries (photo, video, interviews, audio-recording, etc) at least 24-hours before the day of the program to Ayofemi Kirby at ayofemikirby@nypl.org.

Please note that professional photography and video recordings are prohibited without expressed consent.

Location: Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, 515 Malcolm X Boulevard at 135th Street, New York NY 10037

More Info: https://www.nypl.org/events/programs/2017/01/26/black-power-50-talks-yohuru-williams-and-bryan-shih

Basic Research 101 – Were Africans The First Americans?

January 25, 2017 | 6:00pm – 8:00pm

west-africansBasic Research 101 – Were Africans the First Americans? In the ever expanding information universe finding the right information can be like locating the proverbial needle in a haystack. Don’t worry, we’re here to help. In Basic Research 101 you will get an introduction to everything you need to know to satisfy your information needs. We will research an interesting topic (like the one above) to help you learn where to look for the information you need, how to navigate catalogs, databases and websites, and how to evaluate what you find. Topics will include databases, electronic resources and selected internet tools.

So, if you have a research paper due, want to satisfy your curiosity on a random topic, or just help your kids with their homework, Basic Research 101 is the place for you.

Location: Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, 515 Malcolm X Boulevard at 135th Street, New York NY 10037

Cost: Free

More Info: https://www.nypl.org/events/programs/2016/01/25/basic-research-101-were-africans-first-americans