Families outraged over Frederick Douglass Academy’s failing grade — but are afraid to speak out

It remains unclear why the Harlem academy fell so drastically from an adequate  grade of a C to a failing one. Also unclear: what will be done.

Eff this!

Frederick Douglass Academy in East Harlem was given a failing grade by the Department of Education earlier this month and students, while outraged, are afraid to speak out.

Frederick Douglass Academy in East Harlem was given a failing grade by the Department of Education earlier this month and students, while outraged, are afraid to speak out.

The once-prestigious Frederick Douglass Academy in Harlem got an F on the  city’s latest report cards this month — and families are livid.

“I’m really angry,” said one fuming woman who sends her 12-year-old grandson  to the school on Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Blvd. and 148th St. “I want my grandson  to do well, but they are making it hard.”

The 44-year-old woman — who declined to be identified citing possible  retaliation from the school — said the academy “is acting like everything is  good,” despite the failing grade. Her grandson, a seventh grader, agreed.

“My teachers don’t give me credit for my homework that I turn in,” he said,  voicing fears that his own grades could prevent him from achieving his dream of  being a lawyer . “I’m working hard, and I’m failing.”

The Department of Education grades public schools on their performance each  year, examining factors like the school’s environment and how well the  institution prepares students for college and a career.

 Only last month, The News ranked the academy as the 29th best public high  school in the city, praising it for “an environment of order, maturity and  seriousness.”

But it remains unclear why the Douglass Academy fell so drastically from a C  grade to a failing one in such a short period of time. It is also unclear what  will be done to check the school’s decline.

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