Harlem Stage Gatehouse – Harlem Travel Guide – iPhone, iPad, iPod

In celebration of artists of color

In October 2006, Aaron Davis Hall moved into its new home in the Gatehouse and became known as Harlem Stage. This breathtaking structure, designed by Frederick S. Cook in a Romanesque Revival style, was part of the Croton Aqueduct water system. In 1981, this extraordinary structure was designated a landmark and listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Harlem Stage is recognized for its creation and development of new works by performing artists of color. Programs include: Waterworks, which supports the creation of significant new works and provides a forum for dialogue between artists and audiences; Harlem Stage on Screen, which supports the works of independent film makers; Harlem Stride, which offers a laboratory for musicians to explore historic and new trends in music, develop collaborative projects, participate in humanities activities with audiences, and present unique and exceptional music programs; E-Moves, an annual program where emerging choreographers showcase their work, which ranges from modern dance to contemporary ballet, hip-hop, and dance theater; SundayWorks, which is a free reading series for artists to present new works; Harlem Stage Partners Program, which supports co-presentations with significant artists and organizations; and Fund for New Work, which provides direct support to emerging artists through commissions, subsidized rehearsal space, and/or workshop presentations.

Visit the recently reopened Aaron Davis Hall they will provide quality low cost performances for the community. Then you can also explore some of New York City’s beautiful Collegiate Gothic-designed buildings on the City College of New York campus.

Transportation: Bus—M4, M5, M11, M100, M101 to 135th Street. Subway—A, B, C, D to 125th, 1 to 137th St.

Enjoy the show

Features

  • More than 360 entries with over 2000 photographs
  • This visually rich app consists of detailed New York City visitor’s information from visitor centers, tourist websites, weather, news, holidays, sales tax, smoking rules, tipping and transportation to and from airports and in the city
  • Detailed descriptions which include uncommonly known cultural and historical facts, websites, phone numbers, hours of operation, prices, menus and hyperlinks that link entries and lead to websites for additional historical and factual information.
  • Entries sorted by name, category, distance, price, and neighborhood
  • Once click to websites, phones, online ordering, online reservations, current menus and more
  • Live calendar
  • Ability to share user comments and mark and save favorites
  • Ask the authors questions through in-app comments to get personalized feedback at your finger tips
  • YouTube videos
  • GPS enabled Google maps with walking, driving and mass transit directions
  • Access offline content anytime
  • Free upgrades for life

What’s inside

  • Nightlife and entertainment from jazz, Latin salsa, opera to classical music;
  • Theatre, dance, spoken word and more;
  • Restaurants featuring soul food to French cuisine and everything in between;
  • Unique ethnic retail shops;
  • Museums that celebrate various cultures;
  • Fine art galleries;
  • Majestic churches and gospel music;
  • Amazing landmarks;
  • Parks and free recreational activities;
  • Guest accommodations;
  • Free internet access and Wi-fi locations;
  • Authentic tours of Harlem;
  • Annual events and festivals;
  • Sales & Deals

   Literally a guide in my pocket

Posted by Max on 13th Jan 2012

I can only subscribe to what other people already have told about the guide. It’s just great that I can read a place description, actually give a call its manager, find it on a map and even hook up on its Twitter channel to keep my eye on it. Very smart!

Download the free Sutro World @ www.sutromedia.com/world and purchase the Harlem Travel Guide today for $2.99!

Follow Welcome to Harlem on:

Website www.welcometoharlem.com
Facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Welcome-to-Harlem/464732145003
Twitterhttps://twitter.com/welcometoharlem
Yelphttp://www.yelp.com/biz/welcome-to-harlem-new-york
Trip Advisorhttp://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d1977036-Reviews-Welcome_to_Harlem-New_York_City_New_York.html
Blogwww.welcometoharlem.wordpress.com

St. Nicholas Park – Harlem Travel Guide – Sutro World

There’s year round activity here

St. Nicholas Park is located at the intersection of two Harlem neighborhoods – Hamilton Heights and Manhattanville. The nearly 23-acre park is situated between 128th and 141st Streets and St. Nicholas Avenue and St. Nicholas Terrace. Some of the land for the park was acquired upon the condemnation of the Croton Aqueduct in 1895, and the additional property was assembled between 1900 and 1909, which included the area at 128th Street known as “The Point of Rocks,” where General George Washington had positioned himself during the Battle of Harlem Heights in 1776. The name of the park is taken from adjacent streets St. Nicholas Terrace to the west and St. Nicholas Avenue to the east. These streets honor New Amsterdam patron saint St. Nicholas of Myra, whose likeness adorned the masthead of the New Netherland ship that brought the first Dutch settlers to New Amsterdam, and who is the inspiration for Father Christmas or Santa Claus. Landscape architect and Parks Commissioner Samuel Parsons designed the park himself. The park was built on a rugged mass of Manhattan schist following the steep and irregular topography of northern Manhattan. The imposing and Gothic-inspired City College of New York campus overlooks the park. Hamilton Grange, the summer home of our first Secretary of the Treasury and one of the nation’s Founding Fathers, Alexander Hamilton, was moved from nearby Convent Avenue into the park in 2008.

Facilities: Basketball courts, dog runs, playgrounds, barbecue area, and handball courts.

Now step inside the City College of New York, the “Poor man’s Harvard” campus and marvel at some of New York City’s beautiful Gothic-designed buildings. Then head on down to Harlem Stage Gatehouse for an intimate performing space in the landmarked Croton Aqueduct water system.

Transportation: Bus—M3, M4, M7, M11, M116. Subway—A, B, C, D to 110th, 116th, 125th, 135th, and 145th Sts.

Enjoy the show

Features

  • More than 360 entries with over 2000 photographs
  • This visually rich app consists of detailed New York City visitor’s information from visitor centers, tourist websites, weather, news, holidays, sales tax, smoking rules, tipping and transportation to and from airports and in the city
  • Detailed descriptions which include uncommonly known cultural and historical facts, websites, phone numbers, hours of operation, prices, menus and hyperlinks that link entries and lead to websites for additional historical and factual information.
  • Entries sorted by name, category, distance, price, and neighborhood
  • Once click to websites, phones, online ordering, online reservations, current menus and more
  • Live calendar
  • Ability to share user comments and mark and save favorites
  • Ask the authors questions through in-app comments to get personalized feedback at your finger tips
  • YouTube videos
  • GPS enabled Google maps with walking, driving and mass transit directions
  • Access offline content anytime
  • Free upgrades for life

What’s inside

  • Nightlife and entertainment from jazz, Latin salsa, opera to classical music;
  • Theatre, dance, spoken word and more;
  • Restaurants featuring soul food to French cuisine and everything in between;
  • Unique ethnic retail shops;
  • Museums that celebrate various cultures;
  • Fine art galleries;
  • Majestic churches and gospel music;
  • Amazing landmarks;
  • Parks and free recreational activities;
  • Guest accommodations;
  • Free internet access and Wi-fi locations;
  • Authentic tours of Harlem;
  • Annual events and festivals;
  • Sales & Deals

Literally a guide in my pocket    

Posted by Max on 13th Jan 2012

I can only subscribe to what other people already have told about the guide. It’s just great that I can read a place description, actually give a call its manager, find it on a map and even hook up on its Twitter channel to keep my eye on it. Very smart!

Download the free Sutro World @ www.sutromedia.com/world and purchase the Harlem Travel Guide today for $2.99!

Follow Welcome to Harlem on:

Website www.welcometoharlem.com
Facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Welcome-to-Harlem/464732145003
Twitterhttps://twitter.com/welcometoharlem
Yelphttp://www.yelp.com/biz/welcome-to-harlem-new-york
Trip Advisorhttp://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d1977036-Reviews-Welcome_to_Harlem-New_York_City_New_York.html
Blogwww.welcometoharlem.wordpress.com

The Classical Theatre of Harlem – Harlem Travel Guide – Sutro World

Langston Hughes, and William Shakespeare work here

Founded in 1999, the Classical Theatre of Harlem (CTH) has enriched the community of Harlem with more than forty productions that have earned it a loyal following. The company, which was recognized by the Drama League as “One of Eight Theatres in America to Watch,” has a fresh and innovative approach to the classics—most noticeable in its nontraditional casting, original adaptations, and music and dance. Productions have included works by Anton Chekhov, Samuel Beckett, Langston Hughes, William Shakespeare, and August Wilson, among others. CTH also earned the Lucille Lortel Award for an Outstanding Body of Work, an OBIE Award for Artistic Excellence, and a Drama Desk Award for Artistic Excellence, to name a few. This theater is one of Harlem’s true gems in every sense. Currently, CTH performs at Harlem Stage Gatehouse and Harlem School of the Arts. CTH is slated to move into the historic Victoria Theater on 125th Street, several doors down from the Apollo Theater, once it is renovated.

Pay a visit to The Hispanic Society of America Museum and Library located in the beautiful Audubon Terrace Historic District and enjoy a free guided tour of the museum that has been preserving and promoting the arts and cultures of Spain, Portugal, and Latin America since 1908. Then stop by the landmarked Church of the Intercession and marvel at the large English Gothic complex consisting of the cathedral-like church and tower, a full cloister, vicarage, vestry, and parish house.

Transportation: Bus—M2, M3, M4, M5, M100, M101. Subway—1 to 157th St.

Enjoy the show

Features

  • More than 360 entries with over 2000 photographs
  • This visually rich app consists of detailed New York City visitor’s information from visitor centers, tourist websites, weather, news, holidays, sales tax, smoking rules, tipping and transportation to and from airports and in the city
  • Detailed descriptions which include uncommonly known cultural and historical facts, websites, phone numbers, hours of operation, prices, menus and hyperlinks that link entries and lead to websites for additional historical and factual information.
  • Entries sorted by name, category, distance, price, and neighborhood
  • Once click to websites, phones, online ordering, online reservations, current menus and more
  • Live calendar
  • Ability to share user comments and mark and save favorites
  • Ask the authors questions through in-app comments to get personalized feedback at your finger tips
  • YouTube videos
  • GPS enabled Google maps with walking, driving and mass transit directions
  • Access offline content anytime
  • Free upgrades for life

Thank you !  

Posted by Ryan Morrison on 20th Jan 2012

I’ve been traveling a lot and used many Sutro guides but the this one is one of the best so far.

More Reviews

Download the free Sutro World @ www.sutromedia.com/world and purchase the in-app Harlem Travel Guide today for $2.99!

Follow Welcome to Harlem on:

Website – www.welcometoharlem.com
Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Welcome-to-Harlem/464732145003
Twitter – https://twitter.com/welcometoharlem
Yelp – http://www.yelp.com/biz/welcome-to-harlem-new-york
Trip Advisor – http://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d1977036-Reviews-Welcome_to_Harlem-New_York_City_New_York.html
Blog – www.welcometoharlem.wordpress.com

Feet’s Too Big? No Problem; Everyone Dances Here

Fats Waller Dance Party: Small's Paradise The pianist Jason Moran (left, in the Fats Waller mask) and Meshell Ndegeocello performed at the Harlem Stage Guardhouse as part of the Harlem Jazz Shrines Festival.

Once, a special event in jazz meant something warm and secretive and spontaneous: two guys who hadn’t seen each other in a while, improvising several choruses together. But lately — since the early 1990s, when jazz became fixed in the world of arts grants and cultural institutions — it has often meant something more structured, official and imposing: heady written music, presented before a theater audience, sometimes elaborated with text or image or drama, program-noted and documented and ready to be reproduced elsewhere.

Now it can, and should, mean something like what happened over the weekend at Harlem Stage Gatehouse. On Friday and Saturday Jason Moran and Meshell Ndegeocello led a band of jazz musicians through tunes that started in fragments of Fats Waller songs, or songs Waller played, or sometimes just the words from songs he played: “Honeysuckle Rose,” “Jitterbug Waltz,” “Your Feet’s Too Big,” “Two Sleepy People.” They started there but ended up in fragmented and repeated funk vamps cued by Mr. Moran’s Fender Rhodes electric piano and Ms. Ndegeocello’s chanting voice.

The Moran-Ndegeocello show was commissioned by Harlem Stage as part of its first annual Harlem Jazz Shrines Festival, a weeklong chain of concerts, exhibitions and talks that ended on Sunday. This event — “Fats Waller Dance Party: Small’s Paradise,” paying tribute both to the spirit of Waller and to a club he played in Harlem — will most likely happen again, in other cities. But it didn’t really matter; the show felt both site-specific and spur of the moment. The band geared itself toward dancing and sounded easygoing its first time out.

With the first notes in Friday’s early set, a crew of hired dancers appeared on the floor, moving in updated swing-style body language. First they were a spectacle unto themselves; then they beckoned the front tables to dance with them; then they became eclipsed by the larger scene, as half of the people in the room got up and came forward.

The professionals worked their impressive routines, but nobody grew cowed or passive around them. The room felt easy and real and radiant: same-sex couples, mixed-race couples, grandparents, sharply dressed college students.

The Fats Waller songs served only as suggestions. In a few places, the rest of the band — including the singer Lisa Harris, the bassist Mark Kelley, the trombonist Corey King and the trumpeter Leron Thomas, who are all originally from Houston, like Mr. Moran — dropped out while Mr. Moran broke out in stride-piano patterns or repeated a fragment of an old melody.

Then the band built on those fragments, in rhythms coming out of 1960s-and-beyond dance music: Motown, house, hip-hop. (The hard grooves came from the drummer Charles Haynes, a jazz musician who has toured with Kanye West and Lady Gaga.)

For a while, playing and dancing, Mr. Moran wore a huge papier-mâché mask of Waller’s head — fedora hat, grin, cigarette in the left corner of the mouth — made by the Haitian artist Didier Civil. It was all joyous and foolish and graceful: somehow both exceptional and no big deal.