Kids Exhibit on Harlem’s Jazz History Opens

larger jazzUPPER WEST SIDE — Kids can learn about the history of Harlem’s jazz scene by tap dancing, learning how to scat or composing their own tune at an exhibit opening Friday at the Children’s Museum of Manhattan.

“Jazzed! The Changing Beat of 125th Street,” aims to transport visitors to Harlem in the 1920s-’40s through photos, music, writing and memorabilia.

In partnership with the National Jazz Museum in Harlem, the exhibit centers on the work of legendary artists Ella Fitzgerald, Bill “Bojangles” Robinson and Duke Ellington. It runs through the end of the year.

Though the exhibit is filled with details about the performers, organizers want “Jazzed!” to feel more like an immersive experience than an academic exhibit, said Thomas Quaranta, the director of exhibitions and museum operations.

Visitors can make their own tap shoes with bottle caps, scat like Fitzgerald on a newly created stage, and compose a new piece for a live pianist to play.

“Jazz is accessible. It’s alive today and it’s about this beat that can be your own,” Quaranta said. “It’s about the moment.”

In that vein, the museum will pipe in classic tunes from the Harlem Renaissance, but also feature live artists performing in the gallery.

Local high school and college students will play jazz sets and improvisations during the day, while more seasoned pros will take the stage on select nights, Quaranta explained.

“When you see somebody like that doing a jazz piece… it really leaves an impression that you otherwise wouldn’t have,” he said, adding that he hoped the musicians would inspire young visitors.

“Jazzed!” also draws the connection between today’s artists — not only musicians but painters, dancers and poets — and those of the Harlem Renaissance.

Through diagrams and text on the walls, kids can learn what it means to influence other artists and how musical legacies live on, Quaranta noted.

“You’ll hopefully get to see how you can get from Eminem to Bojangles,” he said.

Tickets are $11 each and children under 1 can attend for free. The museum is open Tuesday-Friday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and on Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

By Emily Frost on May 22, 2014 11:27am

Harlem’s legendary Apollo Theater celebrates its 80th anniversary

For decades it was the place you could see future superstars as working musicians, like Charlie Parker, Ella Fitzgerald, Duke Ellington, the Tempations, the Supremes and James Brown

What Carnegie Hall is to a classical pianist, the Metropolitan Opera is to a mezzo-soprano and Yankee Stadium is to a third baseman, the Apollo Theater was to a jazz musician, tap dancer, rhythm and blues group or an urban comedian.

James Brown struts his stuff at the Apollo Theater.

James Brown struts his stuff at the Apollo Theater.

“It was the pinnacle,” says Smokey Robinson, who sang there countless times with the Miracles and solo. “It was the most important theater in the world. Once you could say you’d played the Apollo, you could get in any door anywhere. You had made it.”

That stature was by no means assured, or even foreseen, when the Apollo opened its doors on Jan. 26, 1934. Then it was just one among dozens of vaudeville and burlesque theaters offering a quick, cheap relief from the Depression.

As it prepares to mark its 80th anniversary this month, it’s still one of the half dozen most famous theaters in the world. While it’s true that hyperbole and exaggeration flow easily in nostalgic talk of bygone cultural institutions, the Apollo needs neither.

The biggest stars did play there. For a buck or two you could arrive before lunch and stay until after midnight, watching five or six shows by the likes of Charlie Parker, Ella Fitzgerald, the Nicholas Brothers, Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong and Bill Robinson. Or, a few years later, the Temptations, the Supremes and James Brown.

Nor, with the exception of a few marquee gigs years later, did these artists play the Apollo as superstars, with catering in their dressing rooms. They played as working artists: singers, musicians, comedians and dancers who stayed on the circuit 40-50 weeks a year, playing to a few hundred or a few thousand people at a time.

The Apollo was a week of paying work.

It thrived in part because many of these world-class artists couldn’t get enough work from white clubs, theaters or radio networks.

Still, the Apollo was never a consolation prize. It was a theater full of fans who appreciated some of America’s most original and enduring talent. It was a mecca of mostly black culture on America’s most famous black street.

When Sammy Davis Jr. had the devastating car accident that cost him his left eye in 1954, he booked his first comeback show at the Apollo, where he had tap-danced for years as a child prodigy with the Will Mastin Trio.

“This,” he told the audience, “is where I come home.”

Longtime entertainer, community leader Al Stiles has died

Song-and-dance man and community leader Al Stiles has performed his swan song.Stiles, who was declared a living legend in 2002 by the Apollo Theater in Harlem and performed with some of the nation’s best-known entertainers, died Jan. 2. He was 91.bildeBorn in 1924 and raised in Tampa, Fla., Stiles started his entertainment career as a child performer in a five-member jug band. At age 12, he took a bus to New York City with a 9-year-old jug band partner, Nathaniel Reese. Without their parents’ knowledge, they auditioned and played on CBS Radio’s “Major Bowes Amateur Hour.” They won the show’s talent contest.

He performed with a vaudeville novelty and comedy act before touring with a song-and-dance team. In 1939, he and Reese played at the Apollo as well as at the New York World’s Fair with stars such as Josephine Baker, Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker, Ella Fitzgerald and Sammy Davis Jr.

While Stiles has enjoyed sharing his showbiz tales of yesteryear, he was most proud of his work with the Talent Factory, a program he started in the 1980s to teach inner-city youth the theater arts.

“A lot of them have gone on to bigger and better things, and I’m glad for them,” Stiles said in 2002. “It was a goal that I set up to accomplish, and I feel real good about it.”

The program was housed in the back of his shoeshine shop, Al Stiles’ World’s Best Shoe Shine on East Wayne Street. The nonprofit organization went on hiatus in the late 1990s, but performing was still in his heart, even if his body couldn’t take his old song-and-dance routines. He showed Gregory Hines dance moves of his own when Hines performed at the Embassy Theatre in 1996.

In 2002, Stiles released “We Can Fly,” a nine-track blues-and-jazz CD he produced with his jazz-drummer son, Ronald Stiles. Two songs are Stiles’ original compositions.

Stiles, a tap-dance prodigy even as a child, was drafted after the outbreak of World War II and was sent to Baer Field (now Fort Wayne International Airport) in Fort Wayne. He liked the city so much that he decided to stay and raise his family after marrying in 1944. Over the years he worked at International Harvester and Flashfold Box Co.

The community and nation embraced him as well. In 2002 he was among the prominent local African-Americans interviewed included in a national oral history compiled by the nonprofit organization History Makers of Chicago. And in 2007, Stiles received the Ove W. Jorgensen Spirit of Leadership Award from Junior Achievement of Northern Indiana for his service to area youth.

“I have accomplished everything I wanted in life,” he said at the time. “The Lord has blessed me, and I give him the credit. It makes me feel like he has kept me around so I could help others.”

News-Sentinel staff reports
Thursday, January 9, 2014 – 10:12 am

Harlem’s renowned Sylvia’s restaurant coming to St. Pete

ST. PETERSBURG — It won’t immediately bring back the glory days when Duke Ellington and Ray Charles played here, but the opening of Sylvia’s Queen of Soul Food restaurant at the Historic Manhattan Casino next weekend may be the start of better times for the city’s struggling 22nd Street South corridor

On Nov. 9, the famous restaurant plans to open its sole location outside its Harlem base on the ground floor of the rehabbed building at 642 22nd St. S.

City leaders say Sylvia’s will be a destination for tourists and residents at the north end of a sparsely developed business corridor that was the heart of St. Petersburg’s black business community.

For the surrounding area known as Midtown, which has struggled to overcome urban blight and poverty for decades, the restaurant isn’t the only reason for optimism. In the coming months, 22nd Street South will also welcome a microbrewery, an LED light technology manufacturer, along with a Cajun restaurant, ice cream parlor and consignment shop. Further south of the interstate, a Wal-Mart Neighborhood Market will replace the Sweetbay grocery store that closed in February.

In December, St. Petersburg College expects to break ground on a 45,000-square-foot campus that will house a job training program in partnership with the LED company, LumaStream.

“We need to be clear that we’re in the early stages of this. The critical thing is to make sure we keep the momentum going and keep adding one thing after another after another,” said City Council Chairman Karl Nurse, whose district encompasses a large swath of Midtown.

“If that doesn’t happen, it will stop, and we’ll miss the opportunity in a recovering economy.”

The opening of Sylvia’s has been a long time coming.

A once-thriving nightspot, the Manhattan Casino has been closed for nearly 40 years. Its redevelopment was part of a wide-ranging redevelopment plan in Midtown after the 1996 riots in the neighborhood, with dozens of public and private projects totaling more than $200 million.

The results included the sprawling Pinellas County Jobs Corp. training facility, the Cater G. Woodson African-American History Museum and the Tangerine Plaza shopping center anchored by the old Sweetbay store.

The city invested nearly $3 million to renovate the casino building in 2005, but it was left unfinished for several years as the city struggled to find a tenant.

In May, the nonprofit Urban Development Solutions and city officials kicked off a $1.6-million renovation to convert the building’s first floor into Sylvia’s.

The building’s second flood is already open as an event hall.

“This is going to be a magnet. This is a destination restaurant for the entire city, which means people will come from all over,” Mayor Bill Foster said.

City officials hope the prosperity along 22nd Street continues.

The city has acquired land directly across the street from Sylvia’s that is zoned for manufacturing. Economic development officials have been talking with business owners they hope may eventually locate there and bring manufacturing jobs to the area.

“That’s the bottom line for Midtown revitalization is creation of jobs,” said Dave Goodwin, the city’s economic development director.

jboatwright@tampatrib.com

(727) 215-1277

Twitter: @jboatwrightTBO

Sid Bernstein, who brought Beatles to Shea, dies

NEW YORK — Misty-eyed music promoter Sid Bernstein, who booked such top acts as Jimi Hendrix, Judy Garland and the Rolling Stones and hit the highest heights when he masterminded the Beatles’ historic concerts at Shea Stadium and Carnegie Hall, died Wednesday at age 95.

Bernstein’s daughter, Casey Deutsch, said he died in his sleep at a hospital. She cited no illness and said he died of natural causes.

FILE- In this Feb. 12, 1964 file photo, the Beatles, from left Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Ringo Starr on drums, and John Lennon, perform at Carnegie Hall in New York. Sid Bernstein, the music promoter who brought the Beatles to American and was responsible for the Carnegie Hall concert, died Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013 in a New

FILE- In this Feb. 12, 1964 file photo, the Beatles, from left Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Ringo Starr on drums, and John Lennon, perform at Carnegie Hall in New York. Sid Bernstein, the music promoter who brought the Beatles to American and was responsible for the Carnegie Hall concert, died Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013 in a New

For decades, the squat, floppy-haired Bernstein excelled like few others at being everywhere and knowing everybody. He worked with Garland, Duke Ellington and Ray Charles, promoted Dion, Bobby Darin and Chubby Checker and managed Esy Morales, the Rascals and Ornette Coleman. He was an early backer of ABBA, setting up the Swedish group’s first American appearances. He was behind one of the first rock benefit shows, the 1970 “Winter Festival for Peace” at Madison Square Garden, which featured Hendrix and Peter, Paul and Mary. And he helped revive Tony Bennett’s career with a 1962 show at Carnegie Hall.

A master of schmooze and schmaltz in an industry that never quits, Bernstein also had a studious side that led to his biggest break. He took a course on Western civilization at the New School for Social Research that required students to read a British newspaper once a week. It was 1963, and the Beatles were just catching on in their native country.

“This was the right time to be reading an English newspaper,” he explained in a 2001 interview with the music publication NY Rock Confidential. “So here I am reading little stories about this group from Liverpool that is causing a lot of ‘hysteria.’ By the end of the course, I was so Beatle-ized by what I read, even though I did not hear a note, I said, ‘gotta get ‘em.'”

As Bernstein recalled, he couldn’t get his agency interested in the group, so he handled the job himself. He tracked down Beatles manager Brian Epstein and convinced him that he could line up a gig at Carnegie Hall. The Beatles were still unknown in the U.S., and the price was cheap — $6,500 for two shows, a fraction of what Garland might have commanded. The promoter used his own money to pay Epstein, while officials at the classy Carnegie, where no rock stars had been permitted, apparently thought they had taken on a folk quartet. (The story has varied over the years.) The timing was perfect. By February 1964, Beatlemania had crossed over to the States, and the band was set to play on “The Ed Sullivan Show” just three days before the Carnegie concerts, guaranteeing maximum attention at minimum cost.

Once the Beatles hit, Bernstein was primed to get the bands that followed. He arranged shows for the Stones, the Animals and other British groups, while saving his biggest dreams for the Beatles. Everything for Bernstein was the latest and the greatest, but his word was never more golden than in 1965, when he landed the group at Shea Stadium, the idea given to him by a ticket manager at Carnegie Hall.

Continue reading

Dreams of a Harlem Jazz Rebirth

31JAZZ4_SPAN-articleLargeAs another evening falls, the Lenox Lounge sits dim and lonely. Commuters pour out of the 125th Street subway station and onto Lenox Avenue, past its padlocked door. At Ginny’s Supper Club across the street, a mostly black crowd of men in suits and women in heels sips and sways as a band turns out a haunting rendition of John Coltrane’s “My Favorite Things.”

It is said that Coltrane once blew his sax at the Lenox Lounge, which kept regulars, downtowners and tourists coming back for 70 years, even through the neighborhood’s bleak times. Now, with Harlem resurgent, only its remains are on display: its Art Deco finishes, familiar red paneling and famous sign have all been stripped away. Continue reading

Happy Birthday To Jazz Legend Benny Carter!

Harlem-born jazz great Bennett Lester Carter (pictured) was a leading figure in the genre, enjoying one of the lengthiest careers in music ever. A multi-instrumentalist, Benny Carter would showcase mastery of the saxophone, clarinet, and trumpet. Spanning decades, Carter’s musical legacy began in the 1930s and didn’t officially end until the late ’90s – an impressive run that may never be matched again. Affectionately known as the “King” among his fellow jazz musicians, Carter would go on to inspire and mentor a host of players along the way.

SEE ALSO: A Mother to Be Reckoned With…Queen Mother Moore

Carter was born in 1907 as the youngest of three children. His first exposure to music happened by way of his mother giving him piano lessons. He would graduate to other instruments, mostly teaching himself. By the age of 15, Carter would become a side man in some of Harlem’s early jazz clubs.

Although he was inspired by Duke Ellington band member and trumpeter Bubby Miley, Carter would ditch the trumpet out of frustration and pick up the saxophone instead. From there, he would play alongside pianists Fats Waller and Earl Hines, as well as the legendary Duke Ellington himself.

Carter would craft his first recording in 1928 with Charlie Johnson’s Orchestra, going on to lead his own band the next year. As a a master arranger and songwriter, Carter would craft many jazz standards, including the swing standard “Blue Lou” and “When Lights Are Low,” and created tunes for Duke Ellington and others.

Carter would become a standout alto sax player, finally releasing his debut album in 1935, “The Chocolate Dandies (pictured).” That same year, Carter moved to Europe to play with the Willie Lewis Orchestra and did musical arrangements for the BBC.

He returned to the States in 1938, working at Harlem’s Savoy Ballroom with his latest orchestra. His arrangements also appeared on recordings for Lena HorneCount BassieBenny GoodmanGlenn Miller, and more.

In 1943, he moved to Los Angeles, where he engaged in studio work and opened the door for Black composers in the film world. He would pen arrangements for Billie Holiday, Ray CharlesLou Rawls, and Mel Torme before moving in to composing music for large film production.

Quincy Jones looked to Carter as an inspiration when he began his career in composing, and Miles Davis started his recording career as a sideman in Carter’s orchestra and considered him a mentor and close ally. But beyond inspiring and arranging for a growing list of future jazz legends, Carter would take his music around the world with tour stops in Australia and various locales in Europe as well, playing well in to his 80s and finally retiring in 1997.

Having lived a long and full life, Carter would pass from complications arising from bronchitis in July 2003 at age 95.

Carter’s long career is fodder enough for many words of praise but the fact that he was able to take his music to the global stage, offering opportunities to younger players and enhancing the sound of fellow greats, solidifies his place in the pantheon of jazz legends near the top. With jazz standards still enjoyed and re-imagined to this day, Carter’s musical legacy remains untarnished and continues to inspire.

Major rezoning plan for Harlem geared to preserve brownstones by imposing height limits on new homes

Buildings would be capped at 4-6 stories on most residential blocks

Hundreds of New York City’s most glorious brownstones and majestic townhouses will be protected from developers and preserved for generations under a major rezoning proposed for West Harlem.

Mariela Lombard for Daily News    New zoning will preserve existing scale of historic brownstones, such as these along St. Nicholas and W. 145th St. in West Harlem.   The plan would safeguard an architectural treasure trove by imposing height limits in the neighborhood for the first time ever, radically transforming the zoning of a 90-block area.

If the sweeping proposal from the Department of City Planning is approved, it will mark the first time the neighborhood’s zoning has been updated since 1961 — when Robert Wagner was mayor and Nelson Rockefeller was governor.

The so-called downzoning will preserve roughly 95% of the 1,900 lots bounded by W. 126th St. on the south; W. 155th St. to the north; Riverside Drive on the west, and Convent and Edgecombe Aves. to the east.

That includes Sugar Hill, the affluent historic district named for the sweet life enjoyed by its residents, and Hamilton Heights, traditional home to such African-American luminaries as composer Duke Ellington, Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall and civil rights activist W.E.B. DuBois.

“This is huge!” says Manhattan Borough President and mayoral hopeful Scott Stringer.

“By limiting both height and density, it removes the incentive to demolish small buildings and townhouses and replace them with towers — and that keeps gentrification at bay.”

The rezoning will protect West Harlem’s low-lying scale and “guide future development” to mesh with the area’s prewar apartment houses and Beaux Arts, Queen Anne and Romanesque Revival brownstones, says City Planning Commissioner Amanda Burden.

“If my house blows up today, a developer under current zoning could replace the four-story brownstone with a 10- or 15-story building tomorrow,” said Pat Jones, co-chair of Community Board 9’s land use committee. “That out-of-scale development will no longer be possible.”

Heights would be capped at four to six stories on almost all crosstown, residential mid-blocks. They could rise only to six to eight floors on St. Nicholas and Amsterdam Aves. and up to 12 stories on Broadway, a review of the plan shows.

The impetus for the downzoning: Columbia University’s upzoning of an adjacent, 17-acre parcel in Manhattanville, where it will erect a $6 billion, 16-building super-campus, north of 125th St. and west of Broadway, over the next 25 years.

Stringer and City Councilman Robert Jackson, who represents the area, had pressed City Planning officials to rezone the adjoining swath so West Harlem could co-exist with Columbia — and not be dominated by it.

“Columbia is humongous, its endowment is in the billions, and people have a real fear that housing costs will go up and they’ll no longer be able to afford their homes because the new campus will fuel gentrification,” Jackson says.

“Now, developers won’t be able to tear down those homes and build a 25-story tower.”

Under the city’s land-use review procedure, Community Board 9, as of May 7, had 60 days to review the proposal, after which it goes to Stringer, who has a month to review it and suggest changes.

Then it goes to the City Planning Commission, for a 60-day review, and finally, to the City Council, which has 50 days to approve, modify or reject the zoning proposal. Insiders predict it will take effect after some minor tinkering.

Public reviews generally last a maximum of seven months — and that’s a good thing, says state Sen. William Perkins, who represents the area.

“There are preservationists in my district who would chain themselves to those brownstones to protect them,” he says.

“Hopefully, that won’t be necessary now, but we always need to be vigilant and skeptical because there have been zoning betrayals in the past, and that’s why we have a public review process.”

Other provisions of the proposed West Harlem zoning plan would:

* Allow commercial uses in a light-manufacturing district between W. 126th St. and W. 130th St. to spur job creation. The so-called mixed-use zone could attract retail and arts companies or other non-profits.

* Direct future larger-scale development to a single block on W. 145th St. between Broadway and Amsterdam Ave. Only on this one site could a residential building rise to 17 stories, and only if it included a significant amount of affordable housing.

* Steer community facilities — like a gym, a library or a halfway house — to commercial and manufacturing corridors by reducing the amount of floor area they’re permitted in residential areas.

dfeiden@nydailynews.com

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/uptown/major-rezoning-plan-harlem-geared-preserve-brownstones-imposing-height-limits-homes-article-1.1079409#ixzz1vRq6A4Il

Willie ‘The Lion’ Smith: Stride piano’s uptown Rruler

The life of stride pianist Willie “The Lion” Smith was the stuff of legend, but unfortunately, some of that legend seems to have come from Smith’s own imagination. For example, Smith always claimed to have been born in 1897, but his WWI draft registration states that he was born 118 years ago, in November 1893.

Like the date of his birth, the origin of his nickname (“The Lion”) is also subject to debate; Smith always said that he earned it for his bravery as an artilleryman in WWI. After the war, he returned to Harlem and was soon known as one of the three great Harlem stride-piano players (along with James P. Johnson and Fats Waller). Among the Big Three, many remember Smith as the chairman of that particular board: Duke Ellington idolized “The Lion.” Aspiring jazz pianists as diverse as Billy Taylor and Thelonious Monk studied under him. Smith was also a composer, a bon vivant, a student of Judaism and one of those maddening braggarts who could make outrageous claims about his abilities and then proceed to back them up. He was seldom seen without a cigar in his mouth and a derby on his head; he made sure he was noticed, which he usually accomplished by outperforming every other piano player in the room.

When Art Kane published his famous Great Day in Harlem photograph in Esquire magazine in 1958, some wondered where “The Lion” was. Well, Smith showed up for the shoot, but got tired of standing around, so he sat on the stoop of a nearby brownstone while that great photo was taken. Here are five reasons why Willie “The Lion” Smith should have been in that picture.

Copyright 2011 KVIX-FM. To see more, visit http://www.jazz24.org.

Metropolitan Museum Displays Romare Bearden’s The Block, Opens 8/30

 On the occasion of the 100th anniversary  of the birth of Romare Bearden, The    Metropolitan Museum of Art will display    Bearden’s The Block, a six-panel tableau that portrays one city block of the Harlem neighborhood that nurtured his career. On view at the Metropolitan Museum from August 30, 2011, through January 2, 2012, Romare Bearden (1911-1988): A Centennial Celebration is presented in conjunction with a multi-city centennial tribute to the life and work of this great American artist.

Romare Bearden’s embrace of an unusual medium-paper collage-set him apart as an artist. Jazzy, syncopated compositions, made with found materials such as magazine clippings, old photographs, and colored papers elevated the medium to a major art form for storytelling. In The Block (1971), Bearden used the collage medium to present a montage of images in shifting scales and perspectives that alternate between fantasy and reality. It is a world that is at once eminently recognizable and wholly unique.

The Block depicts Lenox Avenue between 132nd and 133rd streets, in New York City’s Harlem neighborhood. Bearden created a colorful scene filled with human activity, much of it taking place on the street. Churches, stores, and apartment buildings provide the backdrop for various scenarios, including a funeral, children playing, a homeless man sleeping, and groups of teens and seniors socializing on the sidewalk. What goes on behind closed doors is revealed through windows and cut-aways in the walls that Bearden called “look-ins.”

Bearden’s images are both simple and complex, and layered with meanings that can be inferred from his references to other art and cultures-Renaissance painting, modern art, African tribal sculpture, and Christian iconography. In 1977 his friend the novelist Ralph Ellison wrote that Bearden’s collages created “a place composed of visual puns and artistic allusions…where the sacred and the profane, reality and dream, are ambiguously mingled.”

About the Artist

Born in North Carolina on September 2, 1911, Bearden spent much of his youth in New York City, where his parents knew the leading figures of the Harlem Renaissance, including the poet Langston Hughes, the musician Duke Ellington, the artist Aaron Douglas, and the social reformer W.E.B. Du Bois. In the 1930s, Bearden himself became active in several artists’ groups in Harlem, and by the 1960s he was a central figure in the cultural life of the community, with a growing national reputation. He helped found the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Spiral group (artists supporting the civil-rights movement), and the Cinqué Gallery, a venue for emerging artists. Respected as an artist, orator, author, and social activist, Bearden also mentored many young people seeking opportunities in the arts.

Romare Bearden (1911-1988): A Centennial Celebration is organized by Lisa Mintz Messinger, Associate Curator in the Museum’s Department of Nineteenth-Century, Modern, and Contemporary Art.

This installation is part of the 2011-2012 Bearden Centennial celebration, organized by the Romare Bearden Foundation in partnership with the Studio Museum in Harlem. For more information about these centennial events visit: www.beardencentennial.org.

In conjunction with this installation, audio commentary on Romare Bearden’s work will be available as a stop on the Metropolitan’s Audio Guide program. The Block will also be featured on the Museum’s website at www.metmuseum.org.

Read more: http://broadwayworld.com/article/Metropolitan-Museum-Displays-Romare-Beardens-The-Block-Opens-830-20110817#ixzz1VKsJqFQg