New Harlem tea shop heals the community, customers say

Serengeti Teas and Spices offers hundreds of leafy blends, many from Africa.

Caranda Martin is happy to help customers with his soothing African teas at his new shop, Serengeti Teas and Spices.

Caranda Martin is happy to help customers with his soothing African teas at his new shop, Serengeti Teas and Spices.

Harlemites wouldn’t give up their new favorite shop for all the tea in Africa.

Serengeti Teas and Spices, which opened two weeks ago on Frederick Douglass  Blvd. near W. 123rd St., has not only become instantly popular — it’s also being  credited with curing the sick.

“This shop is great,” said Henry Mattox, 51, who claims a bubbling mix of  hibiscus and rooibos, a South African red leaf, reduced his 4-year-old son’s  103-degree fever in hours.

“It broke his fever,” Mattox said. “I know it was because of the tea. I’m a  believer in it.”

Harlem resident Henry Mattox says the tea cured his sick 4-year-old son, Jamel.

Harlem resident Henry Mattox says the tea cured his sick 4-year-old son, Jamel.

Shop owner Caranda Martin, a Liberian native, opened Serengeti Teas to offer  hundreds of blends, many from Africa, just to name a few.

Martin, whose grandmother was a botanist, credited the antioxidents in the  tea he sold Mattox for his son’s quick recovery.

“Herbs are good for your body,” said Martin, who formerly worked for Red  Rooster owner Marcus Samuelsson. “The teas have a nutritious factor. That is our  objective here.”

The shop is cozy with chairs, comfy ottomans and a long wooden table for  laptop tappers, a common laborer in many Manhattan neighborhoods.

Harlem native Christopher Pearson stopped by Sunday to enjoy an iced blood  orange tea, which comes from Sri Lanka.

“It’s never been nothing like this in Harlem,” he said. “It adds to what’s  going on in Harlem now. I like it.”

Serengeti Teas and Spices, 2292 Frederick Douglass Blvd. near W. 123rd  St., (212) 866-7100. For info, visit http://www.serengetiteasandspices.com.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/uptown/tea-africa-article-1.1472129#ixzz2goMhKjgb

The boy Harry from Harlem did good

To most younger people who remember him, Harry Belafonte is mainly known for singing infectious but vaguely annoying 1950s Afro-Caribbean pop songs like Day-O.

Indeed, anyone under 30 may not know who he is at all.

If so, this expansive and entertaining, if sometimes hagiographic, documentary from Susanne Rostock will definitely set them straight.

And if Rostock’s film is a little fawning now and then, it’s hard to blame her, because Belafonte’s has been a truly extraordinary life.

Born in extreme poverty in a Harlem tenement in 1927, Harold George Bellanfanti Jr was the child of a Caribbean housekeeper, and was partly raised in Jamaica by his grandfather.

After finishing high school in Harlem, he served in the US Navy during World War II and returned to New York. He was working as a janitor’s assistant when a tenant gave him tickets to a show at Harlem’s American Negro Theater.

The theatre’s resident company used plays to give a voice to the black American experience, and the young Belafonte was entranced.

He met Sidney Poitier and began acting, but also experimented with singing and developed a keen interest in folk songs, both American and Jamaican. In 1956 Belafonte had a big hit with Caribbean folk song Matilda, and his debut album Calypso became the first LP to sell over a million copies.

He became an overnight sensation, and audiences went wild for his sensual live performances, but Harry was no mere pop star.

Inspired by the fearless campaigning of black singer Paul Robeson, Belafonte became increasingly exercised by the fate of black Americans, and would be a key player in the Civil Rights movement.

It’s this period of Belafonte’s life that Rostock’s film spends most time exploring, and understandably so, because the singer’s contribution to that cause cannot be overstated.

He bailed Martin Luther King out of Birmingham City Jail; supported the preacher’s family; financed the Freedom Riders; courted the Kennedys; and helped organise the iconic March on Washington in 1963.

Belafonte also rallied Hollywood chums like Marlon Brando, Paul Newman and Charlton Heston to put their names to the Civil Rights movement, and the singer also put his own career, and even his life, at risk.

His energy and commitment is remarkable, and his engagement against injustice has continued; he’s campaigned against apartheid, famine in Africa, and the American engagement in Iraq.

Admirable stuff, and at 85 he’s still going strong.

But Rostock’s film is too respectful to provide genuine insight; the recollections of Belafonte, Poitier and others about the ’60s are fascinating, but Belafonte’s personal life is only nodded to respectfully, and no hard questions are asked.

Why, for instance, has he been so consistently ambivalent about the presidency of Barack Obama?

- Paul Whitington

Congo In Harlem, Raises Awareness to crises through cinema and lectures

“Congo In Harlem” is here again. In its 3rd annual installation, Congo In Harlem is a week- long film series dedicated to screening films that educate the global community on important issues that affect the Democratic Republic of Congo and that explore and celebrate Congolese culture.

Organized by Friends Of The Congo, a nonprofit organization, as a part of a global movement known as Congo Week, Congo In Harlem III will take place from October 16, 2011 – October 23, 2011 at the Maysles Theater in Harlem, 343 Malcolm X Boulevard, New York City, between 127th & 128th Streets. Screenings are open to the public at a suggested donation of $10, where all proceeds will fund and support emerging Congolese Filmmakers.

Congo In Harlem III will also include musical performances, evening receptions, and panel discussions led by Activists, award-winning Journalist and Author Howard French, and critically acclaimed Film Directors, to name a few. “Congo in Harlem Film and Performance series represents the flag ship event of Congo Week. Congo in Harlem provides a platform for Congolese filmmakers, performers, intellectuals, activists and practitioners to articulate the challenges and prescriptions for what is the greatest humanitarian crisis at the dawn of the 21st century,” said Maurice Carney, Friends of The Congo Director.

Congo In Harlem provides a very interactive program for audience members to be engaged, entertained, and educated about one of the most devastating crises in the world.

In addition to the Congo In Harlem event as a part of Congo Week, Friends of The Congo has developed many strategic alliances and partnerships and will partake in prominent activities throughout the globe that lead up to Congo Week. Furthermore, Congo Week is a preface to the Breaking The Silence Speakers Tour, where intellectuals and activists unite and travel the world to educate students and youth about the crisis in the Congo and provide them with ways to get involved in the global movement in support of the Congo.

“With the tremendous response from organizers in many countries during Congo Week, Friends of the Congo follows up Congo Week with visits to communities in North America, Europe and Africa on a Breaking the Silence Speakers Tour to organize and mobilize supporters around the global movement in support of the Congo,” said Kambale Musavuli, Student Coordinator and National Spokesperson for Friends Of The Congo.

“Breaking the Silence Congo Week is a global youth movement connecting ordinary people around the world with Congolese youth who are striving to bring about peaceful and lasting social change in the Congo. Young people in the Congo are working day and night to
determine their own affairs in the same non-violent, progressive spirit as the youth in the North Africa who stood up against tyranny to bring about change in their countries,” Kambale added.

To Learn More About Congo In Harlem, Please Visit: http://www.congoinharlem.org

To Purchase Tickets and For The Full Congo In Harlem program, visit: http://www.mayslesinstitute.org/cinema/congo.html

The Congo is the greatest humanitarian crisis in the world today where nearly 6 million people have died since 1996, half of them children under 5 years old and hundreds of thousands of women have been raped all as a result of the scramble for Congo’s wealth. The United Nations said it is the deadliest conflict in the world since World War Two. Nearly 45,000 people are dying each month, with no worldwide resolution to end the conflict and carnage there.

The Friends of the Congo (FOTC) is a 501 (c) 3 tax-exempt advocacy organization based in Washington, DC. The FOTC was established in 2004 to work in partnership with Congolese to bring about peaceful and lasting change in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), formerly Zaire.

“Speaking Truth To Empower.”

Faith Ringgold: Painting, Fiber Art, Sculpture

Born on October 8, 1930, in Harlem, New York, Faith Ringgold is considered to be one of the most important living African American artists. Working in a variety of mediums including painting, sculpture, and performance, Ringgold is best known for her “story quilts” that combine narrative paintings with quilted borders and text.

Ringgold’s mother, a fashion designer and seamstress, nurtured her creative abilities from a young age. Ringgold attended City College of New York where she earned a Bachelor’s degree in Fine Art and Education in 1955. She taught art in New York’s public schools from 1955–1973 and earned her Master’s degree in art in 1959. During this time, Ringgold also married and divorced jazz pianist Robert Earl Wallace with whom she had two daughters. In 1962, she was remarried to Burdette Ringgold.

Ringgold’s oil paintings and posters of the mid-to-late 1960s carried strong political messages and were supportive of the civil-rights movement. In 1970 she participated in a demonstration against the exclusion of black and women artists by New York’s Whitney Museum of American Art and the Museum of Modern Art. This resulted in the inclusion of Betye Saar and Barbara Chase-Riboud in the Whitney Sculpture Biennial, making them the first black women ever to exhibit at the Museum.

In the early 1970s Ringgold abandoned traditional painting and began making unstretched acrylic paintings on canvas with soft cloth frames after viewing an exhibition of Tibetan art at the Rijk Museum in Amsterdam. During this time, Ringgold also began lecture tours and traveling exhibitions to colleges and universities around the United States. In 1973, she retired from teaching altogether to continue touring and create art full time.

In 1983 Ringgold began to combine images and handwritten text in her painted “story quilts,” which conveyed imaginative narratives. In 1984, a 20-year retrospective of her work was held at The Studio Museum in Harlem. That same year, Ringgold also became a professor at the University of California, San Diego, a position that she still holds today.

Over the course of her career, Ringgold has published 12 children’s books including the award winning “Tar Beach” which is based on her story quilt. As well, a book of her memoirs was published in 1995. She has exhibited in major museums in the USA, Europe, South America, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. Ringgold is in the permanent collections of numerous museums including the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and The Museum of Modern Art.

Retrospectives of Ringgold’s work have been held by Rutgers University, New Brunswick (1973), the Studio Museum in Harlem, New York (1984), and the Fine Arts Museum of Long Island, Hempstead (1990). Her work has been included in numerous exhibitions devoted to political art, women’s art, contemporary quilts, and African-American art, as well as in the Whitney Biennial (1985). Ringgold has received many honours, including the National Endowment for the Arts awards in sculpture (1978) and painting (1989), a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (1987), and fifteen honorary doctorates.

Ringgold currently lives and works in La Jolla, California, and Englewood, New Jersey. For more information, visit Faith Ringgold.com.

October 8, 2011 By Leave a Comment

African-American Art: Why It’s So Unique

art

African American art is really hot and stuffy. there are many reasons here for hot art which we discuss bellow. If we look deep into the mater than we will know about the intensity and culture these are those factors that make is hot and attractive for all people.

Johnson may be known as a low-budget comedy routines and booty-shaking music videos, who led a successful bet, the cable channel he founded that has transformed the first black American billionaire in 2001. Johnson may be known as a low-budget comedy routines and booty-shaking music videos, who led a successful bet, the cable channel he founded the uterus, it has become the first black American billionaire in 2001.

Suspension Den Robert Johnson is an oil from 1930 by an African-American artist named Palmer Hayden. The painting depicts a black American businessman to shine his shoes. The painting depicts a black American businessman to shine his shoes.

The issue is smartly dressed in suits and disputes, as Johnson himself, a yellow ribbon down sport shirt crisp and bright blue. The issue is smartly dressed in suits and disputes, as Johnson himself is a yellow bow down sport shirt crisp and bright blue.

But in his private moments, he was moved by art that documents the struggles and achievements of black people in America. But in his private moments, he was moved by art that documents the struggles and achievements of black people in America. Since the 1980 Johnson, 62, brought together about 250 works of 19 century and 20, African-American artists. Since the 1980 Johnson, 62, brought together about 250 works of 19 century and 20, African-American artists.

Although the collection of Johnson is probably only worth a couple million dollars, contains some of the biggest names in the genre: Cubist-inspired collage artist Romare Bearden (1911-1988), Modernism in Harlem artist Jacob Lawrence (1917-2000 ) and Henry Ossawa Tanner (1859-1937), who studied with Thomas Eakins in 1880 and was the first black artist to receive international awards. Although the collection of Johnson is probably only worth a couple million dollars, contains some of the biggest names in the genre: Cubist-inspired collage artist Romare Bearden (1911-1988), Harlem modernist painter Jacob Lawrence (1917-2000) and Henry Ossawa Tanner (1859-1937), who studied under Thomas Eakins in 1880 and was the first black artist to receive international awards.

contiune reading

http://thenymag.net/african-american-art-why-is-so-unique.html